The Link Between Major Life Events and Quality of Life: The Role of Compassionate Abilities

Abstract

This study examined whether compassionate skills (the ability to be self-compassionate and to receive compassion from others) operate as mediator processes in the relationship between negative major life events and psychological quality of life (QoL), in 467 adults. The path model accounted for 48% of psychological QoL’ variance and indicated that negative appraisal of major life events was associated with decreased psychological QoL, through increased levels of shame and less compassionate abilities. Findings support the importance of community programmes to enhance psychological QoL, that help individuals cultivate self-compassion and the ability to receive compassion from others, especially in face of adverse events.

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Ferreira, C., Barreto, M. & Oliveira, S. The Link Between Major Life Events and Quality of Life: The Role of Compassionate Abilities. Community Ment Health J 57, 219–227 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-020-00638-z

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Keywords

  • Major life events
  • Shame
  • Compassionate abilities
  • Psychological quality of life (QoL)