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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 8, pp 987–990 | Cite as

Social Inequalities in Psychological Well-Being: A European Comparison

  • Stefanie Schütte
  • Jean-François Chastang
  • Agnès Parent-Thirion
  • Greet Vermeylen
  • Isabelle Niedhammer
Brief Report

Abstract

The objective was to explore the educational differences in psychological well-being, measured using the WHO-5 Index, among 15,362 men and 20,272 women in 31 European countries. Relative Index of Inequality, multilevel logistic regression analyses and interaction tests were performed. Within Europe, large cross-national differences in the prevalence of poor well-being were observed. In almost all countries, the prevalence of poor well-being was higher in low educational groups, but the magnitude of these inequalities was much larger in some countries than in others. The highest social differences in well-being were observed in the European Union candidates countries among both genders. Future health promotion programs should consider strategies that target lower educational groups.

Keywords

Well-being WHO-5 Index Social inequalities in health Relative Index of Inequality Education Gender Europe 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the French research network of health, environment and toxicology of the Île-de-France region (DIM SEnT, PhD funding for Stefanie Schütte, Grant No. 10-T1) and by the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES, previously called AFSSET, Grant No. 2009-1-43).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefanie Schütte
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jean-François Chastang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Agnès Parent-Thirion
    • 4
  • Greet Vermeylen
    • 4
  • Isabelle Niedhammer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.INSERM, U1018, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Epidemiology of Occupational and Social Determinants of Health Team, Hôpital Paul Brousse, Bâtiment. 15/16VillejuifFrance
  2. 2.Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018VillejuifFrance
  3. 3.Université de Versailles St-Quentin, UMRS 1018VillejuifFrance
  4. 4.European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working ConditionsDublinIreland

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