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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 86–96 | Cite as

Swiss Psychiatrists Beliefs and Attitudes about Cannabis Risks in Psychiatric Patients: Ideologically Determined or Evidence-based?

  • Daniele Fabio Zullino
  • Hans Kurt
  • Barbara Broers
  • Anita Drexler
  • Hans-Peter Graf
  • Yasser Khazaal
  • Yves Le Bloc’h
  • Baya-Laure Pegard
  • François Borgeat
  • Martin Preisig
Original Paper

Abstract

The objective of this survey was to assess the beliefs of Swiss psychiatrists about the risks associated with cannabis, and to assess their prohibitive attitudes toward their patients. Eighty-two doctors agreed to fill-up the questionnaire. Cluster analysis retained a 3-cluster solution. Cluster 1: “Prohibitionists” believed that cannabis could induce and trigger all forms of psychiatric disorder, and showed a highly prohibitive attitude. Cluster 2: “Causalists” believed that schizophrenia, but not other psychiatric disorders, could be induced and triggered. Cluster 3: “Prudent liberals” did not believe that psychiatric disorders could be induced by cannabis, and were generally less prohibitive.

Keywords

Cannabis Mental disorders Attitude of health personnel Drug and narcotic control 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniele Fabio Zullino
    • 1
  • Hans Kurt
    • 2
  • Barbara Broers
    • 3
  • Anita Drexler
    • 4
  • Hans-Peter Graf
    • 5
  • Yasser Khazaal
    • 6
  • Yves Le Bloc’h
    • 6
  • Baya-Laure Pegard
    • 7
  • François Borgeat
    • 6
  • Martin Preisig
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Substance AbuseUniversity Hospitals of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Private PracticeSolothurnSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of Community MedicineUniversity Hospitals of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Private PracticeThalwilSwitzerland
  5. 5.Psychiatric Hospital Münsingen MunsingenSwitzerland
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Hospitals of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland
  7. 7.Private practiceNeuchatelSwitzerland

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