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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 1069–1071 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in Castanopsis chinensis Hance (Fagaceae)

  • Guomin Huang
  • Lan Hong
  • Wanhui Ye
  • Hao Shen
  • Honglin Cao
  • Wei Xiao
Technical Note

Abstract

Twelve novel microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Castanopsis chinensis. Four previously reported microsatellites from Castanopsis cuspidata were cross-amplified in C. chinensis. Forty-two sample trees from a wild population were tested for polymorphism using a set of the 16 polymorphic microsatellites. The average allele number of these microsatellites was 4.6 per locus, ranging from 2 to 7. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.262–1.000 and 0.238–0.818, respectively. Significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were detected at five loci and no linkage disequilibrium was observed.

Keywords

Castanopsis chinensis Microsatellite Population genetics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KZCX2-YW-430) and Chinese Forest Biodiversity Monitoring Network.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guomin Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lan Hong
    • 1
  • Wanhui Ye
    • 1
  • Hao Shen
    • 1
  • Honglin Cao
    • 1
  • Wei Xiao
    • 1
  1. 1.South China Botanical Garden, The Chinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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