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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 721–724 | Cite as

Identification and cross-species amplification of EST derived SSR markers in different bamboo species

  • Vikas Sharma
  • Pankaj Bhardwaj
  • Rahul Kumar
  • Ram Kumar Sharma
  • Anil Sood
  • Paramvir Singh Ahuja
Technical Note

Abstract

The availability of expressed sequence data derived from gene discovery programs became an alternative source of mining simple sequence repeat (SSR) and developing inexpensive genetic markers for the crop improvements. In present study, 10 express sequence tags (EST)-SSR markers were identified from Bambusa oldhamii public sequence data base. Transferability to 25 species of Bambusoideae ranged from 30% to 100%. The number of alleles detected per locus ranged from 2 to 10. All the newly identified SSR markers were found to be moderately to highly polymorphic with an average Polymorphic Information Content (PIC) value of 0.54. As these loci represents transcribed region and recorded high level of cross transferability and reliable amplification across the species, demonstrating the utility of these markers for functional and genetic analyses of bamboo species.

Keywords

Bambusa oldhamii Bamboo Cross-amplification EST-SSR 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We gratefully acknowledge Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India, New Delhi for financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vikas Sharma
    • 1
  • Pankaj Bhardwaj
    • 1
  • Rahul Kumar
    • 1
  • Ram Kumar Sharma
    • 1
  • Anil Sood
    • 1
  • Paramvir Singh Ahuja
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biotechnology, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource TechnologyIHBT (CSIR)PalampurIndia

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