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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 8, Issue 6, pp 1269–1271 | Cite as

Microsatellite markers for Caesalpinia echinata Lam. (Brazilwood), a tree that named a country

  • Sônia Cristina Oliveira Melo
  • Fernanda Amato Gaiotto
  • Fernanda Barbosa Cupertino
  • Ronan Xavier Corrêa
  • Alessandra Maria Moreira Reis
  • Dário Grattapaglia
  • Rosana Pereira Vianello Brondani
Original Paper

Abstract

Caesalpinia echinata, commonly known as Pau-brasil (Brazilwood), the famous tree that named Brazil is native to the Atlantic forest. Men extensively exploited it ever since discovery and colonial times due to its value as a source of red dye. As a consequence, Brazilwood is a threatened species with populations reduced to small forest fragments. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed from an enriched genomic library. Using fluorescently-labeled primers, a total of 83 alleles were found after analyzing a sample of 44 trees. These high genetic information content markers should allow detailed investigations of mating systems, gene flow, population structure and paternity in natural populations.

Keywords

SSR Atlantic forest Natural population Allelic diversity Conservation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Research supported by Brazilian National Research council—CNPq, Bahia State Foundation for Research Support—FAPESB, and Biodiversitas Foundation. S.C.O.M and F.B.C. held CNPq fellowships.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sônia Cristina Oliveira Melo
    • 1
  • Fernanda Amato Gaiotto
    • 1
  • Fernanda Barbosa Cupertino
    • 1
  • Ronan Xavier Corrêa
    • 1
  • Alessandra Maria Moreira Reis
    • 2
  • Dário Grattapaglia
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rosana Pereira Vianello Brondani
    • 4
  1. 1.Departamento de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Estadual de Santa CruzIlheusBrazil
  2. 2.Universidade Católica de BrasíliaBrasiliaBrazil
  3. 3.Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e BiotecnologiaBrasiliaBrazil
  4. 4.Laboratório de BiotecnologiaEmbrapa Arroz e FeijãoGoianiaBrazil

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