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Cluster Computing

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 751–756 | Cite as

An advanced taxi movement model in the working day movement for delay-tolerant networks

  • SangYeob Oh
Article

Abstract

Vehicle safety communications is an important technology for preventing automobile accidents. The number of neighbor nodes is important in the automobile industry, which is becoming increasingly more customer-oriented. The Opportunistic Network Environment (ONE) simulator is a specialized tool for the simulation of a routing protocol in a delay-tolerant network (DTN). Various movement models, including random waypoint, working day movement, and post-disaster movement, have been studied. DTN is a network suggested for communication between networks with significantly varied delay times. In order to raise the accuracy of simulation results in DTNs, a movement model that considers an actual situation is very important. As for the ONE simulator, a working day movement model shows actual movement patterns of people among various movement models. For types of transportation, a road, a vehicle and a bus are provided, but a real-life situation is not provided for a taxi. A taxi moves to a destination via the shortest route when there is a customer; otherwise, it moves at fast speeds randomly. Such movement can generate various communication situations and packet transmission in a DTN. Therefore, this paper aims to design an advanced taxi movement model.

Keywords

DTN Taxi movement model WDM PRM RWP 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Gachon University research fund of 2013. (GCU-2013-R106).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Interactive MediaGachon UniversitySeongnam-siKorea

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