Advertisement

Czechoslovak Journal of Physics

, Volume 49, Supplement 1, pp 971–977 | Cite as

Removal of iodide ion from simulated radioactive liquid waste

  • H. Kodama
Radiochemical Problems in Nuclear Waste Management

Abstract

The previous study reported that BiPbO2(NO3) is one of the most promising candidate materials for removing and immobilizing radioactive iodide. In that case, the solution contained only dissolved NaI and did not contain competing anions. This paper reports the reactivity of BiPbO2(NO3) with iodide ions in simulated radioactive liquid waste. This liquid contains many components, especially highly concentrated NaNO2, Na2CO3 and NaNO3. The obtained results show that BiPbO2(NO3) is useful for removing iodide ion from the simulated radioactive liquid waste but that there is a problem which should be resolved in the future. The problem is that a competing anion, HCO3 , interferes with the exchange reaction, and only the surfaces of the BiPbO2(NO3) crystals are used for the reaction.

Keywords

Liquid Waste Bi203 Promising Candidate Material Platinum Capsule Radioactive Iodide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    P. Taylor, D. D. Wood and V. J. Lopata: Solidification of Dissolved Aqueous Iodide by Reaction with α-Bi2O3 Powder to Form Bi5O7I. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Canada AECL-9554, 1988Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    P. Taylor: A Review of Methods for Immobilizing Iodine-129 Arisung from A Nuclear Fuel Recycle Plant, with Emphasis on Waste-Form Chemistry. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Canada AECL-10163, 1990Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    H. Kodama: Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 65 (1992) 3011CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    H. Kodama: in Proc. of the Ion Ex’93 Conference, Wrexham UK 1993 (Eds. A. Dyer, M. J. Hudson and P. A. Williams) 1993, p. 55Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    H. Kodama: J. Solid State Chem. 112 (1994) 27CrossRefADSMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    H. Kodama: Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 67 (1994) 1788CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    J. Ketterer, E. Keller and V. Krämer: Z. Crystallogra. 172 (1985) 63Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    H. Kodama: in Proc. of the Ion Ex’95 Conference, Wrexham UK 1995 (Eds. A. Dyer, M. J. Hudson and P. A. Williams) 1997, p. 39Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    H. Kodama: in Proc. of the Ion ICIE’95 Conference, Takamatsu Japan 1995, p. 285Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    J. Ketterer and V. Krämer: Mat. Res. Bull. 20 (1985) 1031CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    I. Kobayashi, K. Iijima, Y. Miyamoto and Y. Nakanishi: Technical Report (Japanese), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, No. 96 (1995) 124Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    I. Kobayashi, K. Iijima, Y. Miyamoto and Y. Nakanishi: in Proc of Waste Management’96, AZ 1996, 7-4Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute of Physics, Acad. Sci. CR 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kodama
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute for Research in Inorganic MaterialsTsukuba, IbarakiJapan

Personalised recommendations