Advertisement

Czechoslovak Journal of Physics

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp D291–D297 | Cite as

Monitoring of atmospheric 14CO2 in central European countries

  • I. Světlík
  • L. Tomášková
  • M. Molnár
  • E. Svingor
  • I. Futó
  • T. Pintér
  • P. Rulík
  • V. Michálek
Nuclear Analytical Methods

Abstract

Carbon-14 is a radionuclide with global occurrence and partly natural origin. The main anthropogenic sources of the 14C were the nuclear weapon tests, namely at the beginning of the 1960s, nowadays the nuclear energy facilities are the main sources. Maximum in the atmospheric 14C activity was observed in 1963. In the following years the considerable 14C activity decrease was due to intensive carbon deposition into oceanic water and sediments particularly. At present the 14C activity approximates the level before nuclear age, corresponding to ∼0 ‰ Δ 14C. Another actual type of anthropogenic influence is the Suess effect, i.e., the dilution of 14C by fossil carbon (fuel combustion). This effect causes a decrease of the 14C activity on a global, regional and local scale. Thus, monitoring of actual reference level of 14C activity gives a possibility to indicate local or global anthropogenic influences. This paper reporting data from the atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring in the Czech Republic and Hungary compares the actual results with other European countries. The observed effects connected with local and regional CO2 releases from fossil fuel combustion are discussed.

Keywords

Nuclear Power Plant Atmospheric 14CO Fossil Fuel Combustion Nuclear Weapon Test Fossil Carbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. [1]
    Report of the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to the General Assembly: “Exposures from natural and man-made sources of radiation”, rep. 1, 2000.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Meijer H. A. J., Van der Plicht, J., Gislefoss, J. S., and Nydal, R.: Radiocarbon 37 (1995) 39.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Reimer P. J., Brown T. A. and Reimer R. W.: Radiocarbon 46 (2004) 1299.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Suess H. E.: Science 122 (1955) 415.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Kuc T. and Zimnoch M.: Radiocarbon 40 (1998) 417.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Stuiver M. and Polach H. A.: Radiocarbon 19 (1977) 355.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Světlík I., Mirchi R., Michálek V. and Tomášková L.: In: Proc. XXVII Days of Radiation Protection, Liptovsky Jan 2005, Slovakia 2005, p. 220.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Gupta S. K. and Polach H. A.: Radiocarbon dating practises at ANU, ANU 1985, Canberra.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Uchrin G. and Hertelendi E.: Development of a reliable differential Carbon-14 sampler for environmental air and NPP stack monitoring. Final Report of the OMFB contract No. 00193/1991 (in Hungarian), 1992.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Csongor É. and Hertelendi E.: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research „B” 17 (1986) 493.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    Hertelendi et al.: Radiocarbon 31 (1989) 399.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Csongor É., Szabó I. and Hertelendi E.: Radiochem. and Radioanal. L. 55 (1982) 303.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Hertelendi E.: Radiocarbon 32 (1990) 283.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Hertelendi E. et al.: In: Proc. 4th Working Meeting Isotopes in Nature. Leipzig, 1986. (Eds. U. Wand and G. Strauch) Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR Zentralinstitut für Isotopen und Strahlenforschung, Leipzig, 1987, 323.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Levin, I. and Kromer, B.: Radiocarbon 46 (2004) 1261.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Světlík
    • 1
  • L. Tomášková
    • 1
  • M. Molnár
    • 2
  • E. Svingor
    • 2
  • I. Futó
    • 2
  • T. Pintér
    • 3
  • P. Rulík
    • 4
  • V. Michálek
    • 4
  1. 1.Nuclear Physics Institute AS CRPragueCzech Republic
  2. 2.Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI)DebrecenHungary
  3. 3.Paks Nuclear Power PlantHungary
  4. 4.National Radiation Protection InstitutePragueCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations