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Czechoslovak Journal of Physics

, Volume 56, Supplement 4, pp D629–D635 | Cite as

Soils electroremediation

  • M. Němec
  • J. John
  • J. Dostál
  • P. Zapletal
Article
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Abstract

The electroremediation method was developed and used for 137Cs release from contaminated soils long time ago. Suspension of soil with suitable electrolyte was electrolyzed at a constant current in special electrolytic cell and the released radiocaesium was separated in the column with caesium specific absorber. The column activity was measured and the decontamination yield during the process was determined. The contaminated soil was obtained from area of the first nuclear power station in the former Czechoslovakia, where it was contaminated in the 70’s and 80’s. In the experiments, the role of voltage, current, electrolyte composition, and temperature in the decontamination process were studied. It is shown that the method allows separating more than 99 % of radiocaesium within 14 h with energy consumption 120–160 Wh g−1.

Keywords

Phytoremediation Electrolytic Cell Caesium Nuclear Power Station Glass Frit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Němec
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. John
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Dostál
    • 3
  • P. Zapletal
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation ChemistryCzech Technical University in PraguePrague 1Czech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Nuclear ChemistryCzech Technical University in PraguePrague 1Czech Republic
  3. 3.ALLDECO.CZHodonínCzech Republic

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