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Child Psychiatry & Human Development

, Volume 41, Issue 6, pp 614–623 | Cite as

Normative Data on Anxiety Symptoms on the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children in Taiwanese Children and Adolescents: Differences in Sex, Age, and Residence and Comparison with an American Sample

  • Cheng-Fang Yen
  • Chih-Hung Ko
  • Yu-Yu Wu
  • Ju-Yu Yen
  • Fan-Ching Hsu
  • Pinchen Yang
Original Article

Abstract

The aims of this study were to examine the differences in the levels of anxiety symptoms on the Taiwanese version of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC-T) between Taiwanese children and adolescents and the original American standardization sample across gender and age, and to examine differences in sex, age, and residential background in the levels of anxiety symptoms. A total of 10,566 Taiwanese children and adolescents in the community completed the MASC-T. Their levels of anxiety symptoms on the MASC-T were compared with the original American standardization sample in March’s study. The differences in age, sex and residential background in the levels of anxiety symptoms were examined by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results found significant differences in the levels of anxiety symptoms on nearly all MASC-T scales between Taiwanese and American children and adolescents across sex and age. Girls had higher levels of anxiety symptoms on all scales of the MASC-T than boys. Those from 16 to 19 years old had the higher levels of physical symptoms and social anxiety and the lower levels of harm avoidance and separation/panic than those in the 8–11 year- old and 12–15 year- old groups. Those who lived in rural areas had higher levels of physical symptoms and separation/panic than those who lived in urban areas. Those who lived in urban areas had a higher level of harm avoidance than those who lived in rural areas. These results provide fundamental knowledge on anxiety symptoms in Taiwanese children and adolescents. Further study is needed to examine the reasons for socio-cultural differences and differences in individual characteristics in anxiety symptoms.

Keywords

Adolescent Anxiety Child Culture Demographic factor 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was partially supported by grant NSC 98-2410-H-037-005-MY3 awarded by the National Science Council, Taiwan (ROC). The authors thank the Statistical Analysis Laboratory, department of medical research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University for their help.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheng-Fang Yen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chih-Hung Ko
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yu-Yu Wu
    • 4
  • Ju-Yu Yen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Fan-Ching Hsu
    • 1
  • Pinchen Yang
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryKaohsiung Medical University HospitalKaohsiungTaiwan
  2. 2.Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of MedicineKaohsiung Medical UniversityKaohsiungTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, College of MedicineKaohsiung Medical UniversityKaohsiungTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of Child Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical CenterChang Gung University College of MedicineGueishanTaiwan

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