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Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 707–715 | Cite as

PirB Overexpression Exacerbates Neuronal Apoptosis by Inhibiting TrkB and mTOR Phosphorylation After Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Injury

  • Zhao-hua Zhao
  • Bin Deng
  • Hao Xu
  • Jun-feng Zhang
  • Ya-jing Mi
  • Xiang-zhong Meng
  • Xing-chun Gou
  • Li-xian Xu
Original Research

Abstracts

Previous studies have proven that paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) plays a crucial suppressant role in neurite outgrowth and neuronal plasticity after central nervous system injury. However, the role of PirB in neuronal survival after cerebral ischemic injury and its mechanisms remains unclear. In the present study, the role of PirB is investigated in the survival and apoptosis of cerebral cortical neurons in cultured primary after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury. The results have shown that rebarbative PirB exacerbates early neuron apoptosis and survival. PirB gene silencing remarkably decreases early apoptosis and promotes neuronal survival after OGD. The expression of bcl-2 markedly increased and the expression of bax significantly decreased in PirB RNAi-treated neurons, as compared with the control- and control RNAi-treated ones. Further, phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels are significantly downregulated in the damaged neurons. However, the PirB silencing markedly upregulates phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels in the neurons after the OGD. Taken together, the overexpression of PirB inhibits the neuronal survival through increased neuron apoptosis. Importantly, the inhibition of the phosphorylation of TrkB and mTOR may be one of its mechanisms.

Keywords

PirB OGD Neuronal survival Apoptosis TrkB mTOR 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81501207, 81500063, 81471265, 81271290 and 81471415) and the Fourth Military Medical University Foundation (No. 2013-D03).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhao-hua Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bin Deng
    • 1
  • Hao Xu
    • 2
  • Jun-feng Zhang
    • 2
  • Ya-jing Mi
    • 2
  • Xiang-zhong Meng
    • 1
  • Xing-chun Gou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Li-xian Xu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology, College of StomatologyFourth Military Medical UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.Institute of Basic and Translational Medicine & School of Basic Medical SciencesXi’an Medical UniversityXi’anChina

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