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Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 413–421 | Cite as

Expression and Changes of Hyperoxidized Peroxiredoxins in Non-Pyramidal and Polymorphic Cells in the Gerbil Hippocampus During Normal Aging

  • Ki-Yeon Yoo
  • Ok Kyu Park
  • Jiatian Yu
  • Bingchun Yan
  • Hua Li
  • Choong Hyun Lee
  • Jung Hoon Choi
  • Dae Won Kim
  • In Koo Hwang
  • Moo-Ho Won
Original Paper

Abstract

Oxidative stress is one of predisposing factors to age-related neurodegeneration in the brain. In particular, thiol-containing groups are susceptible to oxidative stress, which induces the formation of the disulfide bond and/or hyperoxidized form of thiol-containing proteins. We observed the protein thiol levels in the hippocampal homogenates and also investigated changes in hyperoxidized form of peroxiredoxin (Prx–SO3) immunoreactivity and proteins levels in the gerbil hippocampal subregions during normal aging. Levels of total thiol, non-protein thiol, and protein thiol were decreased in the hippocampal homogenates with age. At post-natal month 1 (PM 1), pyramidal and non-pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) showed Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity. Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity in the cells was decreased by PM 12, thereafter, Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity in the cells increased again with age. In the CA2/3, Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity in pyramidal cells was not significantly changed; however, the immunoreactivity in pyramidal cells was very low at PM 12. Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus (DG) was distinctly changed during aging. At PM 1, Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity in granule and polymorphic cells was weak and strong, respectively. The immunoreactivity in the neurons was decreased with age, not shown in any neurons at PM 12. Thereafter, Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity increased again with age. In addition, Prx–SO3 protein level in the hippocampus was lowest at PM 12. These results suggest that thiol-containing proteins are changed during aging and Prx–SO3 immunoreactivity was different according to cells in the hippocampal subregion during aging.

Keywords

Thiol-containing protein Hyperoxidation Reactive oxygen species Hippocampus Aging 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Mr. Suek Han, Seung Uk Lee and Ms. Hyun Sook Kim for their technical help in this study. This work was supported by the MRC program of MOST/KOSEF (R13-2005-022-01002-0).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ki-Yeon Yoo
    • 1
  • Ok Kyu Park
    • 1
  • Jiatian Yu
    • 1
  • Bingchun Yan
    • 1
  • Hua Li
    • 1
  • Choong Hyun Lee
    • 1
  • Jung Hoon Choi
    • 1
  • Dae Won Kim
    • 2
  • In Koo Hwang
    • 3
  • Moo-Ho Won
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of MedicineHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Division of Life Sciences, Department of Biomedical SciencesHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine, BK21 Program for Veterinary ScienceSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  4. 4.Institute of Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration, College of MedicineHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  5. 5.MRC Research InstituteHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea

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