Soy meal adhesive with high strength and water resistance via carboxymethylated wood fiber-induced crosslinking

Abstract

Soy meal-based wood adhesive has received much interest for its environmentally friendly properties, as it is thought to provide an effective alternative to conventional formaldehyde-based wood adhesives. However, the abundant hydrophilic groups and weak internal structure result in poor water resistance and low bonding strength of soy meal-based wood adhesives. In this study, bio-based carboxymethylated wood fibers (CMWFs) were used to develop a high-performance soy meal-based adhesive. Wood fibers (WFs) were pre-treated via carboxymethylation to endow WFs with abundant carboxyl groups and facilitate their dispersion in soy protein matrix. CMWFs containing abundant carboxyl groups served as a multiple “crosslinking core” and effectively cross-linked with soy protein side-chain, resulting in the construction of a stable adhesive system. The modified soy meal-based adhesive exhibited excellent bonding strength and water resistance. In particular, tension tests indicated that the water-resistant bonding strength of the adhesive modified with CMWFs reached 1.69 MPa, which was 160% higher compared with the unmodified adhesive; the wood failure percentage of the plywood bonded by CMWF-modified soy meal-based adhesive was as high as 100%. Moisture uptake and residual rate tests indicated that high water resistance of the adhesive was achieved. This design provides a facile and sustainable strategy for developing high-performance soy meal-based adhesives.

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Acknowledgments

This research was funded by “The Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities” (No. 2016ZCQ01) and “the National Key Research and Development Program of China” (No. 2017YFD0601205).

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Pang, H., Wang, Y., Chang, Z. et al. Soy meal adhesive with high strength and water resistance via carboxymethylated wood fiber-induced crosslinking. Cellulose (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10570-021-03732-x

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Keywords

  • Soy protein
  • Wood fiber
  • Carboxymethyl nanocellulose
  • Bio-based composite adhesive