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Cellulose

, Volume 25, Issue 7, pp 4133–4144 | Cite as

Highly efficient visible-light photocatalyst based on cellulose derived carbon nanofiber/BiOBr composites

  • Aobo Geng
  • Liang Meng
  • Jingquan Han
  • Qiang Zhong
  • Meirun Li
  • Shuguang Han
  • Changtong Mei
  • Lijie Xu
  • Lin Tan
  • Lu Gan
Original Paper
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

There is an urgent need to explore alternatives to replace traditional carbonaceous materials because of dwindling oil reserves and increasing atomospheric carbon dioxide. In the present study, the cellulose derived carbon nanofibers (CCNF) were prepared and used to hybridize with bismuth oxybromide to prepare novel photocatalyst composites (CCNF/BiOBr). The structural properties of the prepared composites were then characterized. Afterwards, the photocatalytic performance of the CCNF/BiOBr composites was investigated through degrading rhodamine B (RhB) under continuous visible light irradiation. The results indicated that the pyrolysis process could convert the cellulose to carbon nanofiber with high graphitization degree. The photocatalytic performance of the CCNF/BiOBr composite was better than that of the pure BiOBr, which was ascribed to the introduction of the CCNF into the composite system. The present work provides a promising way to design new photocatalyst composites with desirable carbon alternatives from biomass materials for effective treatment of organic contaminants in water media.

Graphical Abstract

Keywords

Cellulose Carbon nanofiber Pyrolysis Visible-light photocatalyst Pollutant degradation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (BK20160938), Natural Science Foundation of China (51708297, 31770609), Scientific Research Foundation for High-level Talents of Nanjing Forestry University (GXL2016021), Top-notch Academic Programs Project of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (TAPP), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

Supplementary material

10570_2018_1851_MOESM1_ESM.docx (293 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 292 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aobo Geng
    • 1
  • Liang Meng
    • 2
  • Jingquan Han
    • 1
  • Qiang Zhong
    • 1
  • Meirun Li
    • 1
  • Shuguang Han
    • 1
  • Changtong Mei
    • 1
  • Lijie Xu
    • 2
  • Lin Tan
    • 3
  • Lu Gan
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Materials Science and EngineeringNanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.College of Biology and the EnvironmentNanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Light Industry, Textile and Food EngineeringSichuan UniversityChengduChina

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