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Cellulose

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 3079–3089 | Cite as

Studies on the environmentally friendly deinking process employing biological enzymes and composite surfactant

  • Feng Wang
  • Xin Zhang
  • Guoliang Zhang
  • Jie Chen
  • Mingzhu Sang
  • Zhu Long
  • Bin Wang
Original Paper
  • 105 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, biodegradable cardanol polyoxyethylene ether (CPE) was applied to the field of flotation deinking of mixed office waste paper (MOW), and its combination with fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether (AEO-9), fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether sulfate (AES) as a composite surfactant was also investigated for a green deinking process. The prepared composite surfactant was applied to the traditional alkaline chemical deinking. Moreover, the effect of cutinase on the deinking of MOW was also evaluated for the first time. Cutinases and amylases combined with the previously employed complicated surfactants were utilized to replace traditional chemicals for neutral deinking. The deinking effect and the environmental impact of these two deinking methods were evaluated in detail. The results showed that the surfactant composed of CPE/AEO-9/AES with a mass ratio of 1:1:1 can be used in traditional alkaline deinking, which could effectively improve the deinking pulp quality. Moreover, cutinase/amylase/surfactants deinking system could further enhance the deinking pulp quality. When pulped mixed office waste paper was treated with 0.2% of surfactants, 10 U g−1 of cutinase, 5 U g−1 of amylase at 50 °C for 30 min, the brightness of the deinked papers reached 92.24% ISO with an ink removal rate of 92.63%, tensile index of 24.83 N m g−1, and tear index of 9.48 mN m2 g−1. According to this study, cutinase and amylase combined with cardanol polyoxyethylene ether and other surfactants provide an environmentally friendly and effective deinking strategy.

Keywords

Traditional alkaline deinking Neutral enzymatic deinking Cardanol polyoxyethylene ether Cutinase Amylase Mixed office waste paper 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31270633), the State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering (201512), the Lianyungang 555 Talents Project Program of China (2015-13), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions of China (PAPD).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Feng Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Zhang
    • 1
  • Guoliang Zhang
    • 1
  • Jie Chen
    • 1
  • Mingzhu Sang
    • 1
  • Zhu Long
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bin Wang
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of EducationJiangnan UniversityWuxiChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper EngineeringSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina

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