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Cellulose

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 1873–1881 | Cite as

Effects of PEG loading on electromechanical behavior of cellulose-based electroactive composite

  • Okan Ozdemir
  • Ramazan Karakuzu
  • Mehmet Sarikanat
  • Emine Akar
  • Yoldas Seki
  • Levent Cetin
  • Ibrahim Sen
  • Baris Oguz Gurses
  • Ozgun Cem Yilmaz
  • Kutlay Sever
  • Omer Mermer
Original Paper

Abstract

Electroactive behavior of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-based actuators was investigated in this study. CMC-based films were firstly fabricated by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. Characterization studies of the CMC films were conducted by using Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and tensile testing. CMC-based actuator films were produced by gold coating on both surfaces of CMC-based films. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) at different loadings (1, 1.5 and 2 g) was used to improve electroactive behavior of CMC based actuators. Maximum tip displacements were obtained under DC excitation voltages of 1, 3, 5 and 7 V. CMC based actuator loaded with 1.5 g PEG exhibited the largest tip displacement among other actuators for each excitation voltage. The PEG loading did not lead to considerable differences in tensile strength of CMC-based films. However, Young’s modulus decreased with PEG loading.

Keywords

Carboxymethylcellulose Polyethylene glycol Smart materials Mechanical properties 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Financial support for this study was provided by TUBITAK-The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Project Number: 111M643.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Okan Ozdemir
    • 1
  • Ramazan Karakuzu
    • 1
  • Mehmet Sarikanat
    • 2
  • Emine Akar
    • 3
  • Yoldas Seki
    • 3
  • Levent Cetin
    • 4
  • Ibrahim Sen
    • 3
  • Baris Oguz Gurses
    • 2
  • Ozgun Cem Yilmaz
    • 5
  • Kutlay Sever
    • 6
  • Omer Mermer
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied SciencesDokuz Eylul UniversityBucaTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringEge UniversityBornovaTurkey
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryDokuz Eylul UniversityBucaTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Mechatronics Engineeringİzmir Katip Çelebi UniversityÇiğliTurkey
  5. 5.Department of Mechatronics Engineering, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied SciencesDokuz Eylul UniversityBucaTurkey
  6. 6.Department of Mechanical Engineeringİzmir Katip Çelebi UniversityÇiğliTurkey
  7. 7.Department of Electrical and Electronics EngineeringEge UniversityBornovaTurkey

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