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Cellulose

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 705–715 | Cite as

Paper strengthening by polyaminoalkylalkoxysilane copolymer networks applied by spray or immersion: a model study

  • Camille Piovesan
  • Anne-Laurence Dupont
  • Isabelle Fabre-Francke
  • Odile Fichet
  • Bertrand Lavédrine
  • Hervé Chéradame
Original Paper

Abstract

Two di-alkoxysilanes, with (AMDES, aminopropylmethyldiethoxysilane) or without (DMDES, dimethyldiethoxysilane) an amine function, and a tri-alkoxy aminosilane (APTES, aminopropyltriethoxysilane) as well as their mixtures were introduced in paper as fiber strengthening agents. The polymerization and copolymerization of these polysiloxanes in the paper were investigated. In all the cases where APTES was present, the formation of networks was established by measuring the soluble fraction amount extracted from the treated papers. A slight decrease of the opacity of the paper sheets when AMDES was part of the treatment was noted. The presence of APTES reduced this opacity loss. The study of the physicochemical properties of the treated paper (mechanical strength and alkalinity) demonstrated that, besides the required deacidification feature, the different treatments allowed an efficient strengthening of the cellulose fibers to various extents. Contact angle measurements indicated a decrease of the hydrophilic character of papers treated with the mixture APTES/AMDES and the occurrence of a hydrophobic character of the papers treated with APTES alone. These results were consistently obtained for both spray and immersion treatment processes.

Keywords

Aminoalkylalkoxysilane Copolymerization 3D network Cellulose Strengthening Deacidification 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the PATRIMA Foundation for Camille Piovesan’s research grant (CoMPresSil project). Sabrina Paris from CRCC is warmly thanked for technical assistance.

Supplementary material

10570_2013_151_MOESM1_ESM.doc (68 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 68 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Camille Piovesan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anne-Laurence Dupont
    • 1
  • Isabelle Fabre-Francke
    • 2
  • Odile Fichet
    • 2
  • Bertrand Lavédrine
    • 1
  • Hervé Chéradame
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation des CollectionsMuséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CNRS-USR 3224ParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Polymères et des Interfaces (LPPI, EA 2528), Institut des MatériauxUniversité de Cergy-PontoiseCergy-Pontoise CedexFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’EnvironnementCNRS UMR 8587, Université d’Évry Val-d’EssonneÉvryFrance

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