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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 101–120 | Cite as

Parent Perspectives on Intensive Intervention for Child Maltreatment

  • Mary Russell
  • Annemarie Gockel
  • Barbara Harris
Article

Abstract

Multi-level intervention, based on an ecological perspective, has been promoted at the preferred model of providing parenting support to high-risk families. However, parent views regarding such interventions have not been determined. Focus groups consisting of 24 parents who had recently completed an intensive parenting program yielded results supporting multi-level interventions but highlighting processes rather than content within such programs as well as the reciprocal effect of particular level interventions. Processes identified at intervention levels included Affirming Parent Self-Worth, Non-Directive Instruction, Promoting Social Connections, and Empowering Communication. Increased understanding of and attending to processes in intensive intervention with high-risk families is indicated.

Keywords

Child maltreatment Child protection Parenting 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada provided financial support for this project through funding the Consortium on Health, Intervention, Learning and Development (CHILD) under the directorship of Dr. Hillel Goelman, UBC.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Russell
    • 1
  • Annemarie Gockel
    • 2
  • Barbara Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social Work and Family StudiesUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of Educational and counselling Psychology and Special Education, Faculty of EducationUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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