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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 278–297 | Cite as

Focused Foster Care for Children with Serious Sexual Behavior Problems

  • Robert J. Jones
  • Mark A. Ownbey
  • Julie A. Everidge
  • Bonnie L. Judkins
  • Gary D. Timbers
Article
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Abstract

Properly implemented, foster family care may represent a uniquely appropriate placement/treatment alternative for young children with pronounced or dangerous sexual behavior problems. A few programs have reported preliminary but promising results with such children in fostering environments specifically designed to address their special problems. This study details the salient components of one such program that has proven successful over the past six years with most of thirty youthful clients referred to it facing few alternative placement options. Rankings by program staff and program parents of the relative importance of ten program components to client success are reported, and updates on previously published outcomes with the first six clients to enter the program are offered. Subjective but important “lessons learned” by staff and parents about working with this difficult population in the fostering environment are also discussed.

Key words:

Foster care Children Sexual behavior problems 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Intensive Program was mounted in partnership with the Forsyth County Department of Social Services, and was initially supported by the Kate B. Reynolds Health Care Trust, both in Winston-Salem, NC. The authors also thank program staff John Thacker, Leslie Brown, Tammy Deitz-Hall, Jil Meadows, and Steve White for their continuing work in a still new area, Kimberly Porter for her significant contributions to the original treatment protocol, and particularly the program families who serve this special population of children.

References

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  5. Ownbey, M. A., Jones, R. J., Judkins, B. L., Everidge J. A., & Timbers, G. D. (2001). Tracking the sexual behavior-specific effects of a foster family treatment program for children with serious sexual behavior problems. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 18, 417–436 Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Jones
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark A. Ownbey
    • 1
  • Julie A. Everidge
    • 1
  • Bonnie L. Judkins
    • 1
  • Gary D. Timbers
    • 1
  1. 1.Appalachian State UniversityBooneUSA
  2. 2.Appalachian Family Innovations (formerly BIABH Study Center)MorgantonUSA

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