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Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy

, Volume 19, Issue 6, pp 437–440 | Cite as

Being Well-Informed About Statin is Associated with Continuous Adherence and Reaching Targets

  • Mehmet Birhan Yilmaz
  • Murat Pinar
  • Ilkin Naharci
  • Burcu Demirkan
  • Oben Baysan
  • Mehmet Yokusoglu
  • Kursad Erinc
  • Izzet Tandogan
  • Ersoy Isik
Patient Education

Summary

Background: Statins are life saving drugs in cardiovascular practice. However, they still are underprescribed in many situations despite their well-established benefits. Adherence may be improved by increased comprehension of the patients.

Methods: Patients enrolled into a previous survey were randomized into two groups as those, who were informed comprehensively (Group 1) and those not (Group 2). 202 patients, all of whom were on secondary prevention, were contacted after median 15 months of follow up and evaluated whether they continued the statins, and reached targets.

Results: 102 out of 202 patients were those enrolled into Group 1, and 100 of them were those enrolled into Group 2. In Group 1, 62.7% of patients were on continuous statin therapy during period betweeen initial and secondary contact, whereas, only 46% of patients in Group 2 were on continuous statin therapy (p = 0.017). Being well-informed about statin increased the likelihood of being on continuous statin therapy after median of 15 months by 1.977 folds. Concerning targets, 64.7% of those in Group 1 reached the targets, whereas, 43% of those in Group 2 reached the targets (p = 0.002). Being well-informed about statin increased the likelihood of having suggested targets by ATP III after median of 15 months by 2.430 folds.

Conclusion: Providing patients with comprehensive knowledge about statins, even in patients, who were already on statin therapy, seems not only to improve adherence but also increase the percentage of those reaching targets.

Key Words

statin being well-informed adherence targets 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mehmet Birhan Yilmaz
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Murat Pinar
    • 1
  • Ilkin Naharci
    • 1
  • Burcu Demirkan
    • 2
  • Oben Baysan
    • 1
  • Mehmet Yokusoglu
    • 1
  • Kursad Erinc
    • 1
  • Izzet Tandogan
    • 3
  • Ersoy Isik
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Cardiology and Internal MedicineGülhane School of MedicineAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Yuksek Ihtisas Education and Research HospitalCardiology ClinicAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Department of CardiologyCumhuriyet UniversitySivasTurkey
  4. 4.Department of CardiologyCumhuriyet University School of MedicineSivasTurkey

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