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Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 189–195 | Cite as

Captopril Administered at Night Restores the Diurnal Blood Pessure Rhythm in Adequately Controlled, Nondipping Hypertensives

  • Yuan-Gang Qiu
  • Jian-Hua Zhu
  • Qian-Min Tao
  • Ping Zheng
  • Jun-Zhu Chen
  • Shen-Jiang Hu
  • Fu-Rong Zhang
  • Liang-Rong Zheng
  • Li-Li Zhao
  • Xue-Yan Yao
Clinical Pharmacology

Abstract

The aim of our study was to evaluate whether captopril administered at night, can shift the circadian blood pressure (BP) from a nondipper to a dipper pattern in adequately controlled hypertensive patients, who continued their antihypertensive therapy. In a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled designed study, we enrolled 121 treated, adequately controlled nondipping hypertensive patients. All patients were randomly assigned to 12.5 mg captopril or placebo treatment administered at night. In case of nondippers, the dosage of captopril or placebo was doubled after two weeks of treatment, while for dippers antihypertensive regimens were not changed. After another two weeks, all patients underwent ambulatory BP monitoring. Our results show that at the end of the active treatment period, the prevalence of a dipping diurnal BP pattern in the captopril group (70%) was significantly higher than that in the placebo group (9.8%, P < 0.001). Nighttime BP, night/day BP ratio, nighttime BP load and 24-h systolic BP were significantly lower after 4 weeks nighttime captopril treatment compared to baseline. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that captopril administered at night can restore the diurnal BP rhythm and decrease the elevated night/day BP ratio in appropriately controlled, nondipper hypertensive patients. These results were mainly due to the decrease of nighttime BP.

Keywords

hypertension ambulatory blood pressure monitoring circadian rhythm captopril  

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuan-Gang Qiu
    • 1
  • Jian-Hua Zhu
    • 1
  • Qian-Min Tao
    • 1
  • Ping Zheng
    • 2
  • Jun-Zhu Chen
    • 1
  • Shen-Jiang Hu
    • 1
  • Fu-Rong Zhang
    • 1
  • Liang-Rong Zheng
    • 1
  • Li-Li Zhao
    • 1
  • Xue-Yan Yao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated HospitalZhejiang University, College of MedicineHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Information CenterZhejiang Medical CollegePeople’s Republic of China

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