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Image-guided optimization of the ECG trace in cardiac MRI

  • James D. Barnwell
  • J. Larry Klein
  • Cliff Stallings
  • Amanda Sturm
  • Michael Gillespie
  • Jason Fine
  • W. Brian Hyslop
Original Paper

Abstract

Improper electrocardiogram (ECG) lead placement resulting in suboptimal gating may lead to reduced image quality in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). A patientspecific systematic technique for rapid optimization of lead placement may improve CMR image quality. A rapid 3 dimensional image of the thorax was used to guide the realignment of ECG leads relative to the cardiac axis of the patient in forty consecutive adult patients. Using our novel approach and consensus reading of pre- and post-correction ECG traces, seventy-three percent of patients had a qualitative improvement in their ECG tracings, and no patient had a decrease in quality of their ECG tracing following the correction technique. Statistically significant improvement was observed independent of gender, body mass index, and cardiac rhythm. This technique provides an efficient option to improve the quality of the ECG tracing in patients who have a poor quality ECG with standard techniques.

Keywords

Cardiac MR Magnetic resonance ECG Quality improvement 

Notes

Conflict of Interest

No author/contributor of this study has competing interests to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • James D. Barnwell
    • 1
  • J. Larry Klein
    • 2
  • Cliff Stallings
    • 3
  • Amanda Sturm
    • 3
  • Michael Gillespie
    • 2
  • Jason Fine
    • 4
  • W. Brian Hyslop
    • 5
  1. 1.UNC School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Chapel HillUSA
  3. 3.MRI Department UNC Health CareChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Department of BiostatisticsSchool of Public HealthChapel HillUSA
  5. 5.Department of RadiologyChapel HillUSA

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