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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 69–88 | Cite as

Diet and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium

  • Shu-Chun Chuang
  • Mazda Jenab
  • Julia E. Heck
  • Cristina Bosetti
  • Renato Talamini
  • Keitaro Matsuo
  • Xavier Castellsague
  • Silvia Franceschi
  • Rolando Herrero
  • Deborah M. Winn
  • Carlo La Vecchia
  • Hal Morgenstern
  • Zuo-Feng Zhang
  • Fabio Levi
  • Luigino Dal Maso
  • Karl Kelsey
  • Michael D. McClean
  • Thomas Vaughan
  • Philip Lazarus
  • Joshua Muscat
  • Heribert Ramroth
  • Chu Chen
  • Stephen M. Schwartz
  • Jose Eluf-Neto
  • Richard B. Hayes
  • Mark Purdue
  • Stefania Boccia
  • Gabriella Cadoni
  • David Zaridze
  • Sergio Koifman
  • Maria Paula Curado
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
  • Simone Benhamou
  • Elena Matos
  • Pagona Lagiou
  • Neonilla Szeszenia-Dabrowska
  • Andrew F. Olshan
  • Leticia Fernandez
  • Ana Menezes
  • Antonio Agudo
  • Alexander W. Daudt
  • Franco Merletti
  • Gary J. Macfarlane
  • Kristina Kjaerheim
  • Dana Mates
  • Ivana Holcatova
  • Stimson Schantz
  • Guo-Pei Yu
  • Lorenzo Simonato
  • Hermann Brenner
  • Heiko Mueller
  • David I. Conway
  • Peter Thomson
  • Eleonora Fabianova
  • Ariana Znaor
  • Peter Rudnai
  • Claire M. Healy
  • Gilles Ferro
  • Paul Brennan
  • Paolo Boffetta
  • Mia Hashibe
Original paper

Abstract

We investigated the association between diet and head and neck cancer (HNC) risk using data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. The INHANCE pooled data included 22 case–control studies with 14,520 cases and 22,737 controls. Center-specific quartiles among the controls were used for food groups, and frequencies per week were used for single food items. A dietary pattern score combining high fruit and vegetable intake and low red meat intake was created. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the dietary items on the risk of HNC were estimated with a two-stage random-effects logistic regression model. An inverse association was observed for higher-frequency intake of fruit (4th vs. 1st quartile OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.43–0.62, p trend < 0.01) and vegetables (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49–0.90, p trend = 0.01). Intake of red meat (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.13–1.74, p trend = 0.13) and processed meat (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14–1.65, p trend < 0.01) was positively associated with HNC risk. Higher dietary pattern scores, reflecting high fruit/vegetable and low red meat intake, were associated with reduced HNC risk (per score increment OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.84–0.97).

Keywords

Diet Head and neck cancer Fruit and vegetable Red meat Processed meat 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Shu-Chun Chuang worked on this study during the tenure of a Special Training Award from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. This INHANCE Consortium was supported by a grant from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute (NCI), (R03CA113157) and National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR; R03DE016611). The individual studies were funded by the following grants: Milan study: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC). Aviano: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC), Italian League against Cancer and Italian Ministry of Research. France study: Swiss League against Cancer (KFS1069-09-2000), Fribourg League against Cancer (FOR381.88), Swiss Cancer Research (AKT 617), and Gustave-Roussy Institute (88D28). Italy Multicenter study: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC), Italian League against Cancer and Italian Ministry of Research. Swiss study: Swiss League against Cancer and the Swiss Research against Cancer/Oncosuisse (KFS-700, OCS-1633). Central Europe study: World Cancer Research Fund and the European Commission’s INCO-COPERNICUS Program (Contract No. IC15-CT98-0332). Seattle study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA048996, R01DE012609). North Carolina study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA61188), and in part by a grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (P30ES010126). Tampa study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (P01CA068384, K07CA104231, R01DE13158). Los Angeles study: National Institute of Health (NIH) US (P50CA90388, R01DA11386, R03CA77954, T32CA09142, U01CA96134, R21ES011667) and the Alper Research Program for Environmental Genomics of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Puerto Rico study: jointly funded by National Institutes of Health (NCI) US and NIDCR intramural programs. Latin America study: Fondo para la Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (FONCYT) Argentina, IMIM (Barcelona), Fundac¸a˜o de Amparo a` Pesquisa no. Estado de Sa˜o Paulo (FAPESP) (No 01/01768-2), and European Commission (IC18-CT97-0222). IARC Multicenter study: Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias (FIS) of the Spanish Government (FIS 97/0024, FIS 97/0662, BAE 01/5013), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), and Yamagiwa-Yoshida Memorial International Cancer Study Grant. Boston study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA078609, R01CA100679). Rome study: AIRC (Italian Agency for Research on Cancer). US Multicenter study: The Intramural Program of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA. MSKCC study: NIH (R01CA51845). Seattle-LEO study: NIH(R01CA30022). Western Europe Study: European Commission’s 5th Framework Program (Contract No. QLK1-2001-00182), Italian Association for Cancer Research, Compagnia di San Paolo/FIRMS, Region Piemonte, and Padova University (Contract No. CPDA057222). Saarland study: Ministry of Science, Research and Arts Baden-Wϋrttemberg. Heidelberg study: Grant No. 01GB9702/3 from the German Ministry of Education and Research. Japan study: Scientific Research grant from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, Culture and Technology of Japan (17015052) and grant for the Third-Term Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan (H20-002).

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shu-Chun Chuang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mazda Jenab
    • 2
  • Julia E. Heck
    • 3
  • Cristina Bosetti
    • 4
  • Renato Talamini
    • 5
  • Keitaro Matsuo
    • 6
  • Xavier Castellsague
    • 7
  • Silvia Franceschi
    • 2
  • Rolando Herrero
    • 8
  • Deborah M. Winn
    • 9
  • Carlo La Vecchia
    • 4
    • 10
  • Hal Morgenstern
    • 11
  • Zuo-Feng Zhang
    • 3
  • Fabio Levi
    • 12
  • Luigino Dal Maso
    • 5
  • Karl Kelsey
    • 13
  • Michael D. McClean
    • 14
  • Thomas Vaughan
    • 15
  • Philip Lazarus
    • 16
  • Joshua Muscat
    • 16
  • Heribert Ramroth
    • 17
  • Chu Chen
    • 15
  • Stephen M. Schwartz
    • 15
  • Jose Eluf-Neto
    • 18
  • Richard B. Hayes
    • 19
  • Mark Purdue
    • 9
  • Stefania Boccia
    • 20
    • 21
  • Gabriella Cadoni
    • 22
  • David Zaridze
    • 23
  • Sergio Koifman
    • 24
  • Maria Paula Curado
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
    • 25
  • Simone Benhamou
    • 26
  • Elena Matos
    • 27
  • Pagona Lagiou
    • 28
  • Neonilla Szeszenia-Dabrowska
    • 29
  • Andrew F. Olshan
    • 30
  • Leticia Fernandez
    • 31
  • Ana Menezes
    • 32
  • Antonio Agudo
    • 33
  • Alexander W. Daudt
    • 34
  • Franco Merletti
    • 35
  • Gary J. Macfarlane
    • 36
  • Kristina Kjaerheim
    • 37
  • Dana Mates
    • 38
  • Ivana Holcatova
    • 39
  • Stimson Schantz
    • 40
  • Guo-Pei Yu
    • 40
  • Lorenzo Simonato
    • 41
  • Hermann Brenner
    • 42
  • Heiko Mueller
    • 42
  • David I. Conway
    • 43
  • Peter Thomson
    • 44
  • Eleonora Fabianova
    • 45
  • Ariana Znaor
    • 46
  • Peter Rudnai
    • 47
  • Claire M. Healy
    • 48
  • Gilles Ferro
    • 2
  • Paul Brennan
    • 2
  • Paolo Boffetta
    • 49
    • 50
  • Mia Hashibe
    • 2
    • 51
  1. 1.Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)LyonFrance
  3. 3.UCLA School of Public HealthLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario NegriMilanItaly
  5. 5.Aviano Cancer CentreAvianoItaly
  6. 6.Aichi Cancer Center Research InstituteNagoyaJapan
  7. 7.Institut Català d’OncologiaBarcelonaSpain
  8. 8.Instituto de Investigación EpidemiológicaSan JoséCosta Rica
  9. 9.National Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  10. 10.Department of Occupational HealthUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  11. 11.Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences and Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  12. 12.Institut Universitaire de Medecine Sociale et PreventiveLausanneSwitzerland
  13. 13.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  14. 14.Boston University of Public HealthBostonUSA
  15. 15.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  16. 16.Pen State College of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  17. 17.University of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  18. 18.Departemento Medicina PreventivaUniversidade de Sao PauloSao PauloBrazil
  19. 19.New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  20. 20.Institute of HygieneUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomeItaly
  21. 21.IRCCS San Raffaele PisanaRomeItaly
  22. 22.Institute of OtorhinolaryngologyCatholic University of the Sacred HeartRomeItaly
  23. 23.Cancer Research CenterMoscowRussia
  24. 24.Escola Nacional de Saude PublicaRio de JaneiroBrazil
  25. 25.Bermen Institute for Prevention Research and Social MedBermenGermany
  26. 26.INSERMParisFrance
  27. 27.Institute of Oncology Angel H. RoffoBuenos AiresArgentina
  28. 28.Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of MedicineUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  29. 29.Institute of Occupational MedicineLodzPoland
  30. 30.School of Public HealthUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  31. 31.Institute of Oncology and RadiologyHavanaCuba
  32. 32.Faculdade de MedicinaUniversidade Federal de PelotasPelotasBrazil
  33. 33.Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL)Hospitalet de LlobregatBarcelonaSpain
  34. 34.Hospital de Clinicas de Porto AllegrePorto AlegreBrazil
  35. 35.Unit of Cancer EpidemiologyTurinItaly
  36. 36.School of Medicine and DentistryUniversity of AberdeenScotlandUK
  37. 37.Cancer Registry of NorwayOsloNorway
  38. 38.Institute of Public HealthBucharestRomania
  39. 39.Institute of Hygiene and EpidemiologyPragueCzech Republic
  40. 40.Department of SurgeryMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  41. 41.Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, School of MedicineUniversity of PadovaPaduaItaly
  42. 42.German Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergGermany
  43. 43.Dental School, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life SciencesUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK
  44. 44.University of Newcastle Dental SchoolNewcastleUK
  45. 45.Specialized State Health InstituteBanská BystricaSlovakia
  46. 46.Croatian National Cancer RegistryZagrebCroatia
  47. 47.National Institute of Environmental HealthBudapestHungary
  48. 48.Trinity College School of Dental ScienceDublinIreland
  49. 49.The Tisch Cancer InstituteMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  50. 50.International Prevention Research InstituteLyonFrance
  51. 51.Division of Public Health, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, Huntsman Cancer InstituteUniversity of Utah School of MedicineSalt Lake CityUSA

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