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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 167, Issue 2, pp 479–483 | Cite as

Discrepancies between biomarkers of primary breast cancer and subsequent brain metastases: an international multicenter study

  • O. Kaidar-Person
  • I. Meattini
  • P. Jain
  • P. Bult
  • N. Simone
  • I. Kindts
  • R. Steffens
  • C. Weltens
  • P. Navarria
  • Y. Belkacemi
  • J. Lopez-Guerra
  • L. Livi
  • B. G. Baumert
  • B. Vieites
  • D. Limon
  • N. Kurman
  • K. Ko
  • J. B. Yu
  • V. Chiang
  • P. Poortmans
  • T. Zagar
Clinical trial

Abstract

Purpose

Discordances between the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), expression between primary breast tumors and their subsequent brain metastases (BM) were investigated in breast cancer patients.

Methods

We collected retrospective data from 11 institutions in 8 countries in a predefined-standardized format. Receptor status (positive or negative) was determined according to institutional guidelines (immunohistochemically and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization). The study was subject to each institution’s ethical research committee.

Results

A total of 167 breast cancer patients with BM were included. 25 patients out of 129 with a complete receptor information from both primary tumor and BM (ER, PR, HER2) available, had a change in receptor status: 7 of 26 (27%) ER/PR-positive/HER2-negative primaries (3 gained HER2; 4 lost expression of ER/PR); 10 of 31 (32%) ER/PR-positive/HER2-positive primaries (4 lost ER/PR only; 3 lost HER2 only; 3 lost both ER/PR and HER2); one of 33 (3%) ER/PR-negative receptor/HER2-positive primaries (gained ER); and 7 of 39 (18%) triple-negative primaries (5 gained ER/PR and 2 gained HER2).

Conclusions

The majority of breast cancer patients with BM in this series had primary HER2-enriched tumors, followed by those with a triple-negative profile. One out of 5 patients had a receptor discrepancy between the primary tumor and subsequent BM. Therefore, we advise receptor status assessment of BM in all breast cancer patients with available histology as it may have significant implications for therapy.

Keywords

Breast cancer Brain metastases Molecular subtype Receptors Biomarkers 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Kaidar-Person
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • I. Meattini
    • 4
  • P. Jain
    • 5
  • P. Bult
    • 6
  • N. Simone
    • 7
  • I. Kindts
    • 8
    • 9
  • R. Steffens
    • 10
  • C. Weltens
    • 8
    • 9
  • P. Navarria
    • 11
  • Y. Belkacemi
    • 12
  • J. Lopez-Guerra
    • 13
  • L. Livi
    • 4
  • B. G. Baumert
    • 10
    • 19
  • B. Vieites
    • 14
  • D. Limon
    • 15
  • N. Kurman
    • 15
  • K. Ko
    • 7
  • J. B. Yu
    • 5
  • V. Chiang
    • 16
  • P. Poortmans
    • 17
    • 18
  • T. Zagar
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer CenterChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Radiation Oncology Unit, Oncology InstituteRambam Health Care CampusHaifaIsrael
  4. 4.Radiation Oncology UnitAzienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi-University of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  5. 5.Department of Therapeutic RadiologyYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  6. 6.Department of PathologyRadboud University Medical CenterNijmegenThe Netherlands
  7. 7.Department of Radiation OncologySidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  8. 8.Department of OncologyKU Leuven – University of LeuvenLouvainBelgium
  9. 9.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity Hospitals LeuvenLouvainBelgium
  10. 10.MediClin Robert-Janker-Clinic & Clinical Cooperation Unit of NeurooncologyUniversity Bonn Medical CentreBonnGermany
  11. 11.Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery DepartmentHumanitas Research HospitalMilanItaly
  12. 12.Department of Radiation Oncology and Henri Mondor Breast Center. INSERM U955 E07University of Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC)CréteilFrance
  13. 13.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity Hospital Virgen del RocioSevilleSpain
  14. 14.Department of PathologyUniversity Hospital Virgen del RocioSevilleSpain
  15. 15.Oncology Institute, Davidoff CenterRabin Medical CenterPetah-TikvaIsrael
  16. 16.Department of NeurosurgeryYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  17. 17.Department of Radiation OncologyRadboud University Medical CenterNijmegenThe Netherlands
  18. 18.Department of Radiation OncologyInstitut CurieParisFrance
  19. 19.Department of Radiation OncologyParacelsus Clinic Osnabrueck and University of MuensterMünsterGermany

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