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Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 367–373 | Cite as

Parylene-based implantable platinum-black coated wire microelectrode for orbicularis oculi muscle electrical stimulation

  • Yue-Feng Rui
  • Jing-Quan Liu
  • Bin Yang
  • Ke-Yong Li
  • Chun-Sheng Yang
Article

Abstract

A novel and simple process was proposed to fabricate a parylene-based platinum-black coated wire microelectrode for orbicularis oculi muscle electrical stimulation. Compared with conventional microelectrodes, wire microelectrodes would enable smaller wounds, increased ease of implantation, and improved cosmesis. Meanwhile, the circumferential electrode sites of this wire microelectrode fabricated by lift-off process would contribute to fully contact with tissue and reduction of electrode-tissue interface impedance. The width and the amount of electrode sites could be decided by the thickness and the amount of sacrificial layer, respectively. The platinum-black coatings were electroplated on electrode sites by applying a current pulse train in chloroplatinic acid solution with ultrasonic bath for further electrode-tissue interface impedance reduction and good mechanical stability of coatings. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz has been significantly reduced by 90%, and the cathodic charge storage capacity (CSCc) has been increased by 13 times. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining section of muscle demonstrated the good biocompatibility of this electroplated platinum-black. By applying a charge imbalanced biphasic stimulation waveform for orbicularis oculi muscle stimulation, the rabbits with facial paralysis rehabilitated the function of closing eyes. This kind of microelectrode will be promising for neuromuscular applications.

Keywords

Parylene Platinum-black Implantable Microelectrode Circumferential 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is partly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51035005,No. 60876082), International Corporation Program of Ministry of Science and Technology of China (No.2009DFB10330),The National Key Scientific Program (2010CB933901), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (2009), the “Shu Guang” project (08SG13). The authors are also grateful to the colleagues for their essential contribution to this work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yue-Feng Rui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jing-Quan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bin Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ke-Yong Li
    • 4
  • Chun-Sheng Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Nano/Micro Fabrication TechnologyShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Minstry of Education)ShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Institute of Mico and Nano science and TechnologyShanghai Jiaotong UniversityShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Department of OtorhinolaryngologyShanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First people’s HospitalShanghaiChina

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