Advertisement

Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 25–33 | Cite as

Inertial migration of cancer cells in blood flow in microchannels

  • Tatsuya Tanaka
  • Takuji Ishikawa
  • Keiko Numayama-Tsuruta
  • Yohsuke Imai
  • Hironori Ueno
  • Takefumi Yoshimoto
  • Noriaki Matsuki
  • Takami Yamaguchi
Article

Abstract

The circulating tumor cell test is used to evaluate the condition of breast cancer patients by counting the number of cancer cells in peripheral blood samples. Although microfluidic systems to detect or separate cells using the inertial migration effect may be applied to this test, the hydrodynamic forces acting on cancer cells in high hematocrit blood flow are incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated the inertial migration of cancer cells in high hematocrit blood flow in microchannels. The maximum hematocrit used in this study was about 40%. By measuring the cell migration probability, we examined the effects of cell–cell interactions, cell deformability, and variations in cell size on the inertial migration of cancer cells in blood. The results clearly illustrate that cancer cells can migrate towards equilibrium positions up to a hematocrit level of 10%. We also performed simple scaling analysis to explain the differences in migration length between rigid particles and cancer cells as well as the effect of hematocrit on cancer cell migration. These results will be important for the design of microfluidic devices for separating cells from blood.

Keywords

Inertial migration Cancer cells Red blood cells Cell separation Microchannel 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) and (B) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS; No. 19100008 and No. 22300149). We also acknowledge the support from the 2007 Global COE Program “Global Nano-Biomedical Engineering Education and Research Network Centre.”

References

  1. A.A.S. Bhagat, S.S. Kuntaegowdanahalli, I. Papautsky, Inertial microfluidics for continuous particle filtration and extraction. Microfluid Nanofluid 7, 217–226 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. G.T. Budd, M. Cristofanilli, M.J. Ellis et al., Circulating tumor cells versus imaging-predicting overall survival in metastatic breast cancer. Clin. Cancer Res. 12, 6403–6409 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. D.D. Carlo, Inertial microfluidics. Lab Chip 9, 3038–3046 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. D.D. Carlo, J.F. Edd, D. Irimia et al., Equilibrium separation and filtration of particles using differential inertial focusing. Anal. Chem. 80, 2204–2211 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. M. Cristofanilli, G.T. Budd et al., Circulating tumor cells, disease progression, and survival in metastatic breast cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 351, 781–791 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. M. Cristofanilli, D.F. Hayes, G.T. Budd et al., Circulating tumor cells: A novel prognostic factor for newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer. J. Clin. Oncol. 23, 1420–1430 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. D.R. Gossett, W.M. Weaver, A.J. Mach et al., Label-free cell separation and sorting in microfluidic systems. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 397, 3249–3267 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. S.C. Hur, H.T.K. Tse, D.D. Carlo, Sheathless inertial cell ordering for extreme throughput flow cytometry. Lab Chip 10, 274–280 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. T. Ishikawa, H. Fujiwara, et al., Asymmetry of blood flow and cancer cell adhesion in a microchannel with symmetric bifurcation and confluence. Biomed. Microdevices. 13, 159–167 (2011)Google Scholar
  10. S.S. Kuntaegowdanahalli, A.A.S. Bhagat et al., Inertial microfluidics for continuous particle separation in spiral microchannels. Lab Chip 9, 2973–2980 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. G.Y.H. Lee, C.T. Lim, Biomechanics approaches to studying human diseases. Trends Biotechnol. 25, 111–118 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. R. Lima, S. Wada et al., In vitro blood flow in a rectangular PDMS microchannel: experimental observations using a confocal micro-PIV system. Biomed. Microdevices 10, 153–167 (2008a)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. R. Lima, T. Ishikawa et al., Radial dispersion of red blood cells in blood flowing through glass capillaries: The role of hematocrit and geometry. J. Biomech. 41, 2188–2196 (2008b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. J.S. Park, S.H. Song, H.I. Jung, Continuous focusing of microparticles using inertial lift force and vorticity via multi-orifice microfluidic channels. Lab Chip 9, 939–948 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. E.D. Pratt, C. Huang, B.G. Hawkins, et al., Rare cell capture in microfluidic devices. Chem. Eng. Sci. 66, 1508–1522 (2011)Google Scholar
  16. M. Saadatmand, T. Ishikawa et al., Fluid particle diffusion through high-hematocrit blood flow within a capillary tube. J. Biomech. 44, 170–175 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. S. Suresh, Biomechanics and biophysics of cancer cells. Acta Mater. 55, 3989–4014 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Z. Wu, B. Willing, J. Bjerketorp et al., Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells. Lab Chip 9, 1193–1199 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatsuya Tanaka
    • 1
  • Takuji Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Keiko Numayama-Tsuruta
    • 2
  • Yohsuke Imai
    • 1
  • Hironori Ueno
    • 3
  • Takefumi Yoshimoto
    • 1
  • Noriaki Matsuki
    • 4
  • Takami Yamaguchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Bioengineering and Robotics, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  3. 3.International Advanced Research and Education OrganizationTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringOkayama University of ScienceOkayamaJapan

Personalised recommendations