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Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 59–69 | Cite as

Microdialysis Microneedles for Continuous Medical Monitoring

  • Jeffrey D. Zahn
  • David Trebotich
  • Dorian Liepmann
Article

Abstract

nzyme based biosensors suffer from loss of activity and sensitivity through a variety of processes. One major reason for the loss is through large molecular weight proteins settling onto the sensor and affecting sensor signal stability and disrupting enzyme function. One way to minimize loss of sensor activity is to filter out large molecular weight compounds before sensing small biochemicals such as glucose. A novel microdialysis microneedle is introduced that is capable of excluding large MW compounds based on size. Preliminary experimental evidence of membrane permeability is shown, as well as diffusion and permeability modeling. Microdialysis microneedles present an attractive first step towards decreasing size, patient discomfort and energy consumption of portable medical monitors over existing technologies.

Key Words

microneedle microdialysis porous polysilicon microshell 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey D. Zahn
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • David Trebotich
    • 1
    • 3
  • Dorian Liepmann
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Berkeley Sensor and Actuator CenterUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of BioengineeringUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.Department of BioengineeringThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUSA

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