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Biodegradation

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 343–350 | Cite as

Mass production of bacterial communities adapted to the degradation of volatile organic compounds (TEX)

  • Miléna Lapertot
  • Chantal Seignez
  • Sirous Ebrahimi
  • Sandrine Delorme
  • Paul Peringer
Original Paper

Abstract

This study focuses on the mass cultivation of bacteria adapted to the degradation of a mixture composed of toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes (TEX). For the cultivation process Substrate Pulse Batch (SPB) technique was adapted under well-automated conditions. The key parameters to be monitored were handled by LabVIEW software including, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and turbidity. Other parameters, such as biomass, ammonium or residual substrate concentrations needed offline measurements. SPB technique has been successfully tested experimentally on TEX. The overall behavior of the mixed bacterial population was observed and discussed along the cultivation process. Carbon and nitrogen limitations were shown to affect the integrity of the bacterial cells as well as their production of exopolymeric substances (EPS). Average productivity and yield values successfully reached the industrial specifications, which were 0.45 kgDW m−3 d−1 and 0.59 gDW g C −1 , respectively. Accuracy and reproducibility of the obtained results present the controlled SPB process as a feasible technique.

Keywords

Automated process Biodegradation BTEX Kinetics Metabolic adaptation Stripping 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the European Commission for financial support under the EUREKA project, “Bioreactor For Innovative Mass Bacteria Culture, BIOMAC” (see: www.eureka.be, project E!2497), as well as the CADOX Project (contract no. EVK1-CT-2002–00122).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miléna Lapertot
    • 1
  • Chantal Seignez
    • 1
  • Sirous Ebrahimi
    • 1
  • Sandrine Delorme
    • 1
  • Paul Peringer
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Environmental BiotechnologyENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) LausanneSwitzerland

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