Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 40, Issue 5, pp 819–827 | Cite as

Model-based reconstruction of synthetic promoter library in Corynebacterium glutamicum

  • Shuanghong Zhang
  • Dingyu Liu
  • Zhitao Mao
  • Yufeng Mao
  • Hongwu Ma
  • Tao Chen
  • Xueming Zhao
  • Zhiwen Wang
Original Research Paper
  • 124 Downloads

Abstract

Objective

To develop an efficient synthetic promoter library for fine-tuned expression of target genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

Results

A synthetic promoter library for C. glutamicum was developed based on conserved sequences of the − 10 and − 35 regions. The synthetic promoter library covered a wide range of strengths, ranging from 1 to 193% of the tac promoter. 68 promoters were selected and sequenced for correlation analysis between promoter sequence and strength with a statistical model. A new promoter library was further reconstructed with improved promoter strength and coverage based on the results of correlation analysis. Tandem promoter P70 was finally constructed with increased strength by 121% over the tac promoter. The promoter library developed in this study showed a great potential for applications in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for the optimization of metabolic networks.

Conclusions

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reconstruction of synthetic promoter library based on statistical analysis of C. glutamicum.

Keywords

Corynebacterium glutamicum Correlation analysis Fine-tuned expression Promoter engineering Promoter library 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21576200, NSFC-21776209, NSFC-21621004 and NSFC-21390201) and Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin (No. 15JCQNJC06000).

Supporting information

Supplementary Table 1—Sequence of the individual promoters.

Supplementary material

10529_2018_2539_MOESM1_ESM.doc (82 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 81 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuanghong Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dingyu Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Zhitao Mao
    • 4
    • 5
  • Yufeng Mao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hongwu Ma
    • 4
    • 5
  • Tao Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xueming Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Zhiwen Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and TechnologyTianjin UniversityTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering (Ministry of Education)Tianjin UniversityTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.SynBio Research PlatformCollaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin)TianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Key Laboratory of System Microbial Biotechnology, Tianjin Institute of Industrial BiotechnologyChinese Academy of SciencesTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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