Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 39, Issue 5, pp 775–783 | Cite as

RepSox improves viability and regulates gene expression in rhesus monkey–pig interspecies cloned embryos

  • Hai-Ying Zhu
  • Long Jin
  • Qing Guo
  • Zhao-Bo Luo
  • Xiao-Chen Li
  • Yu-Chen Zhang
  • Xiao-Xu Xing
  • Mei-Fu Xuan
  • Guang-Lei Zhang
  • Qi-Rong Luo
  • Jun-Xia Wang
  • Cheng-Du Cui
  • Wen-Xue Li
  • Zheng-Yun Cui
  • Xi-Jun Yin
  • Jin-Dan Kang
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effect of the small molecule, RepSox, on the expression of developmentally important genes and the pre-implantation development of rhesus monkey–pig interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos.

Results

Rhesus monkey cells expressing the monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 which have a normal (42) chromosome complement, were used as donor cells to generate iSCNT embryos. RepSox increased the expression levels of the pluripotency-related genes, Oct4 and Nanog (p < 0.05), but not of Sox2 compared with untreated embryos at the 2–4-cell stage. Expression of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl2, and the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was also affected at the 2–4-cell stage. RepSox treatment also increased the immunostaining intensity of Oct4 at the blastocyst stage (p < 0.05). Although the blastocyst developmental rate was higher in the group treated with 25 µM RepSox for 24 h than in the untreated control group (2.4 vs. 1.2%, p > 0.05), this was not significant.

Conclusion

RepSox can improve the developmental potential of rhesus monkey–pig iSCNT embryos by regulating the expression of pluripotency-related genes.

Keywords

Embryos (monkey–pig) Interspecies (monkey–pig) somatic cell nuclear transfer mRFP1 Pluripotency RepSox Rhesus monkey 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Xiaohui Wu at Fudan University for providing the pCX-mRFP1 vector. This work was supported by the Science and Technology Development Projects of Jilin Province of China (Grant No. 20160520057JH) and the 13th Five-Year Plan Science and Technology Research Project of Education Department of Jilin Province of China (Grant No. [2016]-257).

Supporting information

Supplementary Table 1—List of primers.

Supplementary material

10529_2017_2308_MOESM1_ESM.docx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 15 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hai-Ying Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Long Jin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qing Guo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhao-Bo Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiao-Chen Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu-Chen Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiao-Xu Xing
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mei-Fu Xuan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guang-Lei Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qi-Rong Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jun-Xia Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cheng-Du Cui
    • 2
  • Wen-Xue Li
    • 2
  • Zheng-Yun Cui
    • 2
  • Xi-Jun Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jin-Dan Kang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Animal Science, Agricultural CollegeYanbian UniversityYanjiChina
  2. 2.Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Transgenic Animal and Embryo EngineeringYanbian UniversityYanjiChina

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