Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 39, Issue 5, pp 751–758 | Cite as

High-sensitivity immunochromatographic assay for fumonisin B1 based on indirect antibody labeling

  • Alexandr E. Urusov
  • Alina V. Petrakova
  • Milyausha K. Gubaydullina
  • Anatoly V. Zherdev
  • Sergei A. Eremin
  • Dezhao Kong
  • Liqiang Liu
  • Chuanlai Xu
  • Boris B. Dzantiev
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objective

To develop a high-sensitivity immunochromatographic test for fumonisin B1 in plant extracts.

Results

Unlike conventional immunochromatographic tests, this assay is performed in two stages: competitive reaction with free specific antibodies and identifying immune complexes by their interaction with the anti-species antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles. The use of a new geometry for the test strip membranes and a novel reagent application method ensures the proper order of these stages without additional manipulations. The contact of the ready-to-use test strip with the liquid sample suffices in initiating all stages of the assay and obtaining test results. The developed test was used on corn extracts; its instrumental limit of fumonisin B1 detection was 0.6 ng ml−1 at 15 min of assay duration.

Conclusions

The proposed approach is flexible and can be used for a wide range of low molecular compounds. The use of anti-species antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles in immunochromatography significantly facilitates the development of test systems by eliminating the need to synthesize and characterize the conjugates with specific antibodies for each new compound to be detected.

Keywords

Fumonisin B1 Gold nanoparticles Immunochromatography Indirect labeling Sensitivity enhancement Test strip 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was financially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant 15-08-07913).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandr E. Urusov
    • 1
  • Alina V. Petrakova
    • 1
  • Milyausha K. Gubaydullina
    • 1
  • Anatoly V. Zherdev
    • 1
  • Sergei A. Eremin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dezhao Kong
    • 3
  • Liqiang Liu
    • 3
  • Chuanlai Xu
    • 3
  • Boris B. Dzantiev
    • 1
  1. 1.A.N. Bach Institute of BiochemistryResearch Center of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Enzymology, Faculty of ChemistryM.V. Lomonosov Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  3. 3.School of Food Science and TechnologyJiangnan UniversityWuxiChina

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