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Atomic Energy

, Volume 123, Issue 4, pp 285–289 | Cite as

Two-Millimeter Radiation from Stratospheric Nuclear Explosions

  • Yu. B. Kotov
  • T. A. Semenova
  • V. F. Fedorov
Article
  • 17 Downloads

The dependence of the spectral power of radiation in the transmission window of air near wavelength 2 mm on the altitude of stratospheric nuclear explosions is investigated. One of the rotational transition lines of nitrogen oxide NO is studied. Calculations of the time dependence of the nitrogen oxide concentration were performed by the method of mathematical modeling of plasma. It is shown that a large amount of nitrogen oxide is formed by explosion γ-rays in the partial-ionization region ahead of the shock wave front; the nitrogen oxide concentration reaches a quasistationary level and remains almost constant for hundreds of microseconds. The quasistationariness is maintained by secondary γ-rays arising in inelastic scattering of explosion neutrons. Estimates of the spectral power of radiation near wavelength 2 mm are obtained. It is shown that at altitude 45 km above the ground the spectral power of the radiation is 105 times greater than for ground-level explosions.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu. B. Kotov
    • 1
  • T. A. Semenova
    • 2
  • V. F. Fedorov
    • 2
  1. 1.Keldysh Institute of Applied MathematicsRussian Academy of Sciences (IPM RAN)MoscowRussia
  2. 2.National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute)MoscowRussia

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