Accountability for governance of liquid communication generated through the use of social media in Botswana: whose duty is it?

Abstract

The continued use of social media by governments requires that the resultant records, currently termed liquid communication, be governed for accountability purposes. However, some governments worldwide and many in Africa do not have information governance policies to ensure accountability for social media generated records. Therefore, this study examines the roles and responsibilities for the governance of liquid communication generated through social media use by the Botswana government. The study adopts a qualitative approach to collect data from purposively selected participants. This study reveals that public relations officers administered the Botswana government’s social media pages. Furthermore, the Botswana National Archives and Records Services was not involved in the country’s liquid communication governance. Therefore, the study recommends a cross-functional approach to the governance of liquid communication in Botswana. All stakeholders' roles and responsibilities in government information management should be clearly spelled out and documented, which is currently not the case.

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Acknowledgments

The study was supported by a grant from the University of South Africa.

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Correspondence to Tshepho Mosweu.

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Mosweu, T. Accountability for governance of liquid communication generated through the use of social media in Botswana: whose duty is it?. Arch Sci (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10502-021-09359-y

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Keywords

  • Accountability
  • Botswana
  • Information governance
  • Liquid communication
  • Social media