The effect of work-leisure conflict on front-line employees’ work engagement: A cross-level study from the emotional perspective

Abstract

Based on the conservation of resources theory, this study explores the relationship between work-leisure conflict and front-line employees’ work engagement. From the emotional perspective, we further explore the mediating role of negative emotion, the moderating effects of emotional intelligence and team emotional climate at the individual and team levels, respectively. In this study, 521 front-line employees from 50 work teams were investigated, and relational models were established and analysed. The results show that work-leisure conflict has a significant negative impact on front-line employees’ work engagement, and the negative emotion from this conflict plays a mediating role in the process. Emotional intelligence plays a moderating role in the relationship between work-leisure conflict and work engagement at the individual level whereas team emotional climate plays a cross-level moderating role in this relationship at the team level. The findings of this study have theoretical value and provide a management reference for enterprise managers.

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Wang, F., Shi, W. The effect of work-leisure conflict on front-line employees’ work engagement: A cross-level study from the emotional perspective. Asia Pac J Manag (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10490-020-09722-0

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Keywords

  • Work-leisure conflict
  • Work engagement
  • Negative emotion
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Team emotional climate