Thermaurantiacus tibetensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from hot spring microbial mat in Tibet

Abstract

Two bacterial strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 were isolated from hot springs in Tibet, China. Based on the results of nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogenetic analyses, strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 were assigned to the family Sphingosinicellaceae, and were closest to Sandaracinobacter sibiricus RB16-17 T (96.04% and 96.12% similarity, respectively). Cells of the both new strains were observed to be motile rod-shape, Gram-staining negative. Growth occurred at pH 6–8 (optimal: pH 7.0) and 37–55 °C (optimal: 45 °C) with 0–1.0% (w/v) NaCl in T4 broth. The cells were found to be positive for oxidase and catalase activities. The major respiratory ubiquinone was Q-8. The major fatty acids were identified as summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c), C16:0, C14:0 2-OH. The major polar lipids were found to consist of sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid, one unidentified glycolipid, three unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G + C contents of strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 were 71.8%. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) value between strain SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 was 99.98%. The amino acid identity (AAI) values between them and their closely related species were below 66.14%. The isolates are characterized by aerobic growth, a yellow endocellular pigment and a higher optimum growth temperature. The results showed that strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 represent a novel species of a novel genus in the family Sphingomonadaceae, and thus the name Thermaurantiacus tibetensis (type strain SYSU G02173T = KCTC 72052 T = CGMCC 1.16680 T) is proposed.

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Data availability and material

The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 have been deposited in GenBank under the accession numbers MT840670 and MT840671, respectively. Whole Genome Shotgun projects of strains SYSU G02173T and SYSU G03142 have been deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under accession numbers JACHTM000000000 and JACHTN000000000, respectively. Four supplementary tables and five supplementary figures are included on the online supplementary files.

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Funding

We are grateful to Professor Aharon Oren (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel) for the Latin construction of the taxa names. This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 91951205 and 31970122), Science and Technology Program of Guangzhou, China (No. 201803030030), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2019M653156), The Fundamental Research Funds for the Universities (No. 19lgpy204), Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation (No. 2019A1515110227). The research was also supported by Innovation Group Project of Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Zhuhai) (No. 3110200005).

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Correspondence to Wen-Jun Li.

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Ming, YZ., Liu, L., Lv, AP. et al. Thermaurantiacus tibetensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from hot spring microbial mat in Tibet. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10482-021-01530-w

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Keywords

  • Thermaurantiacus tibetensis gen. nov.
  • sp. nov.
  • Hot spring
  • Tibet
  • Polyphasic taxonomy