AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 1096–1099 | Cite as

HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Uptake and Retention Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in a Community-Based Sexual Health Clinic

  • J. Carlo Hojilla
  • David Vlahov
  • Pierre-Cedric Crouch
  • Carol Dawson-Rose
  • Kellie Freeborn
  • Adam Carrico
Brief Report

Abstract

In a community-based clinic serving men who have sex with men in San Francisco, California, this study characterized key steps of the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) cascade and identified correlates of retention in care. In total, 344 patients were evaluated for PrEP. Three-fourths (78%) of those who sought PrEP services initiated PrEP. The overall cumulative incidence of discontinuing PrEP at 13 months was 38%. Men with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) were 44% less likely to be retained (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.56, 95% confidence interval [0.33–0.95]). Comprehensive retention efforts for men with STIs are crucial to optimize the benefits of PrEP.

Keywords

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis PrEP Men who have sex with men Retention in care PrEP cascade 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the patients and staff of the Magnet Clinic at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and Jennifer Jain for her assistance in data collection. This study was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), R01-DA033854 (Carrico, PI) and R36-DA041906 (Hojilla, PI). J.C.H. received additional support from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through UCSF-CTSI (TL1 TR000144).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interests.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

This study was granted a waiver of informed consent by the University of California, San Francisco Committee on Human Research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Community Health Systems, School of NursingUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.School of NursingYale UniversityWest HavenUSA
  3. 3.San Francisco AIDS FoundationSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA

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