Initial Investigation of a Reality Therapy Model of Clinical Supervision

Abstract

A single-case research design was conducted to evaluate a reality therapy driven model of clinical supervision as an effective modality for increasing supervisee report of counseling skill use and counseling self-efficacy. Three white, female participant supervisees from the United States received reality therapy driven site supervision during part of a nine-week clinical field experience. The findings indicated that for two of the three participants, self-report of skills and self-efficacy significantly increased during the reality therapy driven supervision phase, while accounting for the supervisees’ predicted growth trend. The third participant did not have a significant change in self-report of skills or self-efficacy; however, all three participants evaluated the reality therapy driven supervision process positively, stating that the model promoted self-evaluation and accountability. The results indicate that reality therapy driven supervision may be an effective model for some supervisees. Discussion includes implications for supervision practice and future research.

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Hunter, Q. Initial Investigation of a Reality Therapy Model of Clinical Supervision. Int J Adv Counselling (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10447-021-09428-y

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Keywords

  • Clinical supervision
  • Reality therapy
  • Theory based supervision
  • SCRD