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Acta Biotheoretica

, Volume 66, Issue 1, pp 17–60 | Cite as

Quaternion-Based Texture Analysis of Multiband Satellite Images: Application to the Estimation of Aboveground Biomass in the East Region of Cameroon

  • Cedrigue Boris Djiongo Kenfack
  • Olivier Monga
  • Serge Moto Mpong
  • René Ndoundam
Regular Article
  • 89 Downloads

Abstract

Within the last decade, several approaches using quaternion numbers to handle and model multiband images in a holistic manner were introduced. The quaternion Fourier transform can be efficiently used to model texture in multidimensional data such as color images. For practical application, multispectral satellite data appear as a primary source for measuring past trends and monitoring changes in forest carbon stocks. In this work, we propose a texture-color descriptor based on the quaternion Fourier transform to extract relevant information from multiband satellite images. We propose a new multiband image texture model extraction, called FOTO++, in order to address biomass estimation issues. The first stage consists in removing noise from the multispectral data while preserving the edges of canopies. Afterward, color texture descriptors are extracted thanks to a discrete form of the quaternion Fourier transform, and finally the support vector regression method is used to deduce biomass estimation from texture indices. Our texture features are modeled using a vector composed with the radial spectrum coming from the amplitude of the quaternion Fourier transform. We conduct several experiments in order to study the sensitivity of our model to acquisition parameters. We also assess its performance both on synthetic images and on real multispectral images of Cameroonian forest. The results show that our model is more robust to acquisition parameters than the classical Fourier Texture Ordination model (FOTO). Our scheme is also more accurate for aboveground biomass estimation. We stress that a similar methodology could be implemented using quaternion wavelets. These results highlight the potential of the quaternion-based approach to study multispectral satellite images.

Keywords

Discrete quaternion Fourier transform Quaternion-based texture indices Multiband satellite images Aboveground biomass Cameroon 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Pierre Ploton for his important contribution to data collection and for fruitful discussions on tropical forest structures. Many thanks go also to Nicolas Barbier, Nicolas Picard and Bonaventure Sonke for their expertise about tropical forest trees, dendrometric properties, forest dynamic processes and radiometric properties of trees, and to the anonymous reviewers for their careful reading of our manuscript and their many insightful comments and suggestions. Finally, they thank all the members of the SAM’s team of UMMISCO-Cameroon. The BIOFORAC Project and the PDI (Programme Doctoral International) of IRD and Paris 6 University have funded this research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UMMISCO, SAM TeamUniversity of Yaoundé 1YaoundéCameroon
  2. 2.UMI 209, UMMISCOIRDBondyFrance
  3. 3.UMI 209, UMMISCOSorbonne Université, Univ. Paris 06ParisFrance

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