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EcoHealth

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 864–870 | Cite as

Detection and Molecular Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus, 2017, Brazil

  • P. O. FigueiredoEmail author
  • A. T. S. Silva
  • J. S. Oliveira
  • P. E. Marinho
  • F. T. Rocha
  • G. P. Domingos
  • P. C. P. Poblete
  • L. B. S. Oliveira
  • D. C. Duarte
  • C. A. Bonjardim
  • J. S. Abrahão
  • E G. Kroon
  • B. P. Drumond
  • D. B. Oliveira
  • G. S. TrindadeEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

At the end of 2016, Brazil experienced an unprecedented yellow fever (YF) outbreak. Clinical, molecular and ecological aspects of human and non-human primate (NHP) samples collected at the beginning of the outbreak are described in this study. Spatial distribution analyses demonstrated a strong overlap between human and NHP cases. Through molecular analyses, we showed that the outbreak had a sylvatic origin, caused by the South American genotype 1 YFV, which has already been shown to circulate in Brazil. As expected, the clusters of cases were identified in regions with a low vaccination coverage. Our findings highlight the importance of the synchronization of animal surveillance and health services to identify emerging YF cases, thereby promoting a better response to the vulnerable population.

Keywords

Yellow fever virus Non-human primates Emerging infectious diseases Zoonotic virus Arboviruses Outbreak 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are thankful to Zoovet Clınica e Consultoria LTDA and Bicho do Mato Meio Ambiente, which provided NHP samples from Conceição do Mato Dentro, Minas Gerais, Brazil. We thank Galileu Barbosa Costa for the critical review of this work and Grant M. Williams for English review. We also thank colleagues from the Laboratório de Vírus (ICB-UFMG) for their excellent technical support. This work has received financial support from Brazilian agencies CAPES and CNPq in accordance with the MCTIC/FNDCT-CNPq/ MEC-CAPES/ MS-Decit / Nº 14/2016 – Prevenção e Combate ao vírus Zika.

Supplementary material

10393_2018_1364_MOESM1_ESM.tif (111 kb)
Supplementary Figure 1: Timeline of disease course. Temporal description of the main signs and symptoms presented by the patient. (TIFF 110 kb)
10393_2018_1364_MOESM2_ESM.tif (313 kb)
Supplementary Figure 2: Phylogenetic tree constructed based on nucleotide sequences of 207 bp of Yellow fiver virus NS5 region. The selection of the best-fit nucleotide substitution model was performed using jModelTest (Posada, 2008). Phylogenetic tree reconstruction using maximum likelihood methods (ML) was performed using MEGA 7 (http://www.megasoftware.net) with 1000 bootstrap replicates by use of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) (Guindon et al., 2010). Based on the AIC, the GTR+G was the best-fit model. These parameters were used for phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Black circles indicate samples in this study and numbers along branches are bootstrap values. (TIFF 313 kb)

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Copyright information

© EcoHealth Alliance 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. O. Figueiredo
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. T. S. Silva
    • 1
  • J. S. Oliveira
    • 1
  • P. E. Marinho
    • 1
  • F. T. Rocha
    • 2
  • G. P. Domingos
    • 2
  • P. C. P. Poblete
    • 3
  • L. B. S. Oliveira
    • 4
  • D. C. Duarte
    • 3
  • C. A. Bonjardim
    • 1
  • J. S. Abrahão
    • 1
  • E G. Kroon
    • 1
  • B. P. Drumond
    • 1
  • D. B. Oliveira
    • 2
  • G. S. Trindade
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Centro Integrado de Pesquisa em Saúde, Faculdade de MedicinaUniversidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e MucuriDiamantinaBrazil
  3. 3.Zoovet Consultoria LTDABelo HorizonteBrazil
  4. 4.Pontifical Catholic University of Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil

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