Spirituality as predictor of depression, anxiety and stress among engineering students

Abstract

Aim

The purpose of present study is to examine the impact of aspects of spirituality on stress, anxiety, depression among engineering students.

Subject and method

Data were collected from 914 engineering students of Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India. A self-administered questionnaire and DASS-21 scale were used to measure spirituality and depression, anxiety, stress in current study. Pearson correlation is used to examine the relationship between spirituality dimensions and stress, anxiety, depression; multiple regression is used to examine the most influencing spirituality dimension; independent sample t-test is used to examine the gender difference in spirituality, stress, anxiety, depression among engineering students.

Result

Findings of the study propagated the positive and significant relationship between universal consciousness and anxiety of engineering students.

Conclusion

The most influencing spirituality dimensions are relationship with self and relationship with others. The sense of spirituality of female students is stronger than that of male students.

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To conduct an ethical research, a written consent from the Dean of Student Welfare, wellness wardens and professors employed by the Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee was undertaken in the present study. Students participated voluntarily in the study without any compensation.

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Negi, A.S., Khanna, A. & Aggarwal, R. Spirituality as predictor of depression, anxiety and stress among engineering students. J Public Health (Berl.) 29, 103–116 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10389-019-01092-2

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Keywords

  • Spirituality
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Correlation
  • Regression