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Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 580–588 | Cite as

Dynamic contact stiffness of vibrating rigid sphere contacting semi-infinite transversely isotropic viscoelastic solid

  • Jiayong Tian
  • Zhoumin Xie
Article

Abstract

Dynamic contact stiffness at the interface between a vibrating rigid sphere and a semi-infinite transversely isotropic viscoelastic solid is investigated. An oscillating force super-imposed onto a static compressive force in the vertical direction excites the vibration of a rigid sphere, which causes variable contact radius and contact pressure distribution in the contact region. The assumption of a sufficiently small oscillating force yields a dynamic contact-pressure distribution of a constant contact radius, which gives dynamic contact stiffness at the interface between the rigid sphere and the semi-infinite solid. Numerical calculations show the influence of vibration frequency of the sphere, and elastic constants of the transversely isotropic solid on dynamic contact stiffness, which benefits quantitative evaluation of elastic constants and orientation of single hexagonal grains by resonance-frequency shifts of the oscillator in resonance ultrasound microscopy.

Key words

dynamic contact wave propagation rigid sphere transversely isotropic viscoelastic solid 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and Technology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Crustal DynamicsChina Earthquake AdministrationBeijingChina

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