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Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 333–336 | Cite as

Magnetic Strips to Simulate Layered Brittle Solids in Cleavage and Fracture Experiments

  • Francisco G. Emmerich
  • Alfredo G. Cunha
  • Carlos M. A. Girelli
  • Arnobio I. Vassem
Article

Abstract

A characteristic of the fracture and cleavage experiments is that they are usually intrinsically destructive. Cracks do not completely heal in an unstressed system, even in crystals such as mica. Here, we used magnetic solids composed of magnetic strips for the non-destructive cleavage and brittle fracture experiments. Between the magnetic strips materials with different mechanical characteristics can be inserted, such as Teflon or foam strips, to change the mechanical properties of the solid. For the cleavage experiments, we developed an apparatus where parameters such as the main involved force can be measured easily. By inserting flaws, the magnetic solid can be used in dynamic fracture experiments, with the advantages of simulating macroscopically a non-destructive experiment in an easier way, that happen in real materials with much higher velocities. The apparatus and the used magnetic solid may be useful for demonstrations of fractures in classes.

Key Words

layered brittle solids non-destructive measurements cleavage fracture 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and Technology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francisco G. Emmerich
    • 1
  • Alfredo G. Cunha
    • 1
  • Carlos M. A. Girelli
    • 1
  • Arnobio I. Vassem
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Carbon and Ceramic Materials, Department of PhysicsUniversidade Federal do Espirito SantoVitoriaBrazil

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