Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 57–64 | Cite as

Quantification of shear damage evolution in aluminium alloy 2024T3

  • Chak-yin Tang
  • Jianping Fan
  • Chi-pong Tsui
  • Tai-chiu Lee
  • Luen-chow Chan
  • Bin Rao
Article

Abstract

Shear damage may occur in the process of metal machining such as blanking and cutting, where localized shear deformation is developed. Experimental findings indicate that microscopic shear damage evolution in aluminium alloy 2024T3 (Al 2024T3) is a multi-stage mechanism, including particle cracking, micro-shear banding, matrix microcracking and coalescence of microcracks. This study is an attempt to use a set of equations to describe the multi-stage shear damage evolution in Al 2024T3. The shear damage variables in terms of multi-couple parameters of a power-law hardening material have been defined. An evolution curve of shearing damage has been calculated from experimental data. The values of the shear damage variable at different stages of damage have also been calculated. By making use of the findings, the relation between the microscopic shear damage evolution and the macroscopic shear response of the material has been discussed.

Key words

shear damage damage evolution equations shear band hardening material microscopic observation 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and Technology 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chak-yin Tang
    • 1
  • Jianping Fan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chi-pong Tsui
    • 1
  • Tai-chiu Lee
    • 1
  • Luen-chow Chan
    • 1
  • Bin Rao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial and Systems EngineeringThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina
  2. 2.School of Civil Engineering and MechanicsHuazhong University Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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