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Chromatographia

, Volume 81, Issue 4, pp 707–718 | Cite as

Analysis of 140 Veterinary Drugs and Other Contaminants in Poultry Muscle by Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • Guozhou Cao
  • Jia Zhan
  • Xizhi Shi
  • Xuhua Deng
  • Jie Zhu
  • Weier Wu
  • Xianfeng Chen
Short Communication

Abstract

A simple, straightforward multi-class analytical method was developed for the identification of 140 veterinary drug residues and other contaminants in poultry muscle, ranging from very polar to reasonably non-polar drugs, including basic, amphoteric, and neutral compounds. The method was based on extraction with acetonitrile–aqueous ethanol aqueous, purification by n-hexane, and low temperature clean-up and analysis in a single analytical run by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–ESI–MS/MS) operating in positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). For most of the target analytes, the optimized pretreatment processes led to no significant interference on the analysis of the sample matrix. Limits of quantification (LOQs) varied from 0.05 to 10 µg kg−1. Average analyte recoveries ranged from 60 to 139%, and the intra-day and inter-day precision were 2–30% and 4–29%, respectively. For over 90% of the analytes, the average recovery values ranged from 70 to 120% with the corresponding RSD below 20%, which were acceptable and in agreement with the criteria of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. This methodology has been successfully applied for the analysis of poultry muscle samples from local markets (China). Quinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and amantadine were frequently detected in poultry samples.

Keywords

Poultry Chicken Multi-class Veterinary drug Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research was supported by the Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team (2015C110018), the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (LR16C190001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31772856), the Public Science and Technology Research Funds Projects of Ocean (No. 201405035), and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

This study was funded by the Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team (2015C110018), the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (LR16C190001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31772856), the Public Science and Technology Research Funds Projects of Ocean (No. 201405035), and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University.

Conflict of interest

Author Guo-zhou Cao declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Jia Zhan declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Xi-zhi Shi declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Xu-hua Deng declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Jie Zhu declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Wei-er Wu declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Xian-feng Chen declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Material Science and Chemical EngineeringNingbo UniversityNingboPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Ningbo Academy of Inspection and QuarantineNingboChina
  3. 3.Shaodong Tianhua Pharmaceutical Co., LtdLinyiChina

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