Sexual dimorphism in Ivory-billed Woodcreepers (Xiphorhynchus flavigaster) in Mexico

Abstract

We analyzed a sample of 173 specimens of different subspecies within the distribution of the Ivory-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus flavigaster) in Mexico. Morphological variables were analyzed separately for males, females, juveniles, and adults. The results showed that males were larger in wing chord, tail length, body mass, and primary 8 length than females. Discriminant function analysis yielded correct classification as males or females in 95% of samples analyzed (92.3% of males and 100% of females). Additionally, we identified morphological variables which presented the highest correlation to obtain linear regression functions for estimating one or more missing variables in specimens. The discriminating function developed offers a means of determining the sex of individual Ivory-billed Woodcreepers, so this tool is valuable for ecological studies and population studies of this species.

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Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Alejandro Gordillo and Adolfo Navarro for their comments on initial versions of the manuscript. We thank to Townsend Peterson and Leonardo Chapa for help in reviewing the manuscript. We thank the curators of the following scientific collections: Mayan Biodiversity Museum (MBM), Universidad Autónoma de Campeche; Zoology Museum, Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Unidad Chetumal (MZ-ECOSUR); Zoology Museum “Alfonso L. Herrera”, Facultad de Ciencias (MZFC), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and Colección Nacional, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (IBUNAM).

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Correspondence to Fernando Puebla-Olivares.

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Communicated by J. Fjeldså.

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Puebla-Olivares, F., Figueroa-Esquivel, E.M. Sexual dimorphism in Ivory-billed Woodcreepers (Xiphorhynchus flavigaster) in Mexico. J Ornithol 150, 755 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-009-0394-2

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Keywords

  • Discriminant functions
  • Mexican Neotropical birds
  • Sexual dimorphism
  • Xiphorhynchus flavigaster