GPS Solutions

, 22:57 | Cite as

Odometer, low-cost inertial sensors, and four-GNSS data to enhance PPP and attitude determination

  • Zhouzheng Gao
  • Maorong Ge
  • You Li
  • Qijin Chen
  • Quan Zhang
  • Xiaoji Niu
  • Hongping Zhang
  • Wenbin Shen
  • Harald Schuh
Original Article
  • 139 Downloads

Abstract

To upgrade the positioning accuracy, re-initialization speed, and attitude determination performance of precise point positioning (PPP) in dynamic applications, we proposed a multi-sensor fusion system consisting of four global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs), namely GPS, BDS, Galileo, and GLONASS, several low-cost inertial sensors, and an odometer. The study shows that the performance of PPP in terms of continuity, reliability, stability, and re-initialization speed improves by such a multi-sensor fusion system. This manifests itself in a significantly increased accuracy. For position solutions, compared to un-aided PPP solutions, the improvements achieved using low-cost inertial navigation system (INS) are about 36.4, 38.7, and 31.3% in the north, east, and vertical components, respectively, and the improvement using odometer are about 1.58, 0.35, and 4.32% relative to the INS-aided PPP solutions. Moreover, using the odometer can provide more than 2.1, 1.4, and 50.6% attitude improvements for roll, pitch, and heading angles compared to the attitude solutions obtained from the INS-aided PPP system. Under GNSS outage conditions, the mean position improvements using the odometer are about 2.3, 1.8, and 8.7%, with maximum increases of 74.6, 74.7, and 28.3%, and the average attitude improvements are about 4.7, 5.4, and 3.3%, with maximum increases of 36.4, 31.7, and 28.9%, respectively. This means that the odometer can enhance the performance of PPP and PPP/INS integration in challenging dynamic conditions.

Keywords

Attitude determination Odometer Precise point positioning (PPP) Global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) Low-cost inertial navigation system (INS) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to GNSS Research Center, Wuhan University, China, for providing the land-borne data and the precise GNSS products. This work was supported partly by National 973 Project of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB733301 and 2013CB733305) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0501804).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhouzheng Gao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maorong Ge
    • 2
  • You Li
    • 4
  • Qijin Chen
    • 3
  • Quan Zhang
    • 3
  • Xiaoji Niu
    • 3
  • Hongping Zhang
    • 3
  • Wenbin Shen
    • 5
  • Harald Schuh
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Land Science and TechnologyChina University of Geosciences BeijingBeijingChina
  2. 2.Helmholtz-Centre PotsdamGFZ German Research Centre for GeosciencesPotsdamGermany
  3. 3.GNSS Research CenterWuhan UniversityWuhanChina
  4. 4.Department of Geomatics EngineeringUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  5. 5.School of Geodesy and GeomaticsWuhan UniversityWuhanChina

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