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Clinical Autonomic Research

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 127–129 | Cite as

Acute onset autonomic dysfunction and orthostatic syncope as an early manifestation of HIV infection

  • Ritsuko Kohno
  • Ryan Koene
  • Paul Sarcia
  • David G. Benditt
Letter to the Editor

To the Editors

Neurological complications, including autonomic disturbances, may occur as a consequence of various infectious diseases [1], including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, in the case of HIV infection, neurologic complications tend to occur at later stages of the disease [2, 3, 4]. Herein, we describe a patient with new onset symptomatic orthostatic hypotension (OH) and laboratory evidence of autonomic dysfunction as an early manifestation of HIV infection.

A 47-year-old previously healthy man presented with three episodes of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) preceded by blurry vision and lightheadedness. The TLOC episodes began abruptly within the previous few weeks, and each was associated with postural change or while climbing stairs. At approximately the same time, he had had diarrhea which resolved, but OH persisted, and, in addition, he experienced muscle aches and headaches. Further, he noted a 9 kg weight loss over several weeks. Prior to...

References

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    Artal FJC (2017) Infectious diseases causing autonomic dysfunction. Clin Auton Res. doi: 10.1007/s10286-017-0452-4 [EPub ahead of print] Google Scholar
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    Robinson-Papp J, Sharma S, Simpson DM, Morgello S (2013) Autonomic dysfunction is common in HIV and associated with distal symmetric polyneuropathy. J Neurovirol 19:172–180CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    Hollenbeck B, Dalia S, McGarry K (2010) Fainting with HIV. Am J Med 123:808–810CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cardiovascular Division, Cardiac Arrhythmia CenterUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Heart Rhythm ManagementUniversity of Occupational and Environmental HealthKitakyushuJapan
  3. 3.Cardiology DivisionPark-Nicollet Medical CenterSt Louis ParkUSA

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