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Planning step-stress test plans under Type-I hybrid censoring for the log-location-scale distribution

  • Chien-Tai LinEmail author
  • Cheng-Chieh Chou
  • N. Balakrishnan
Original Paper
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

The optimal design of a k-level step-stress accelerated life-testing (ALT) experiment with unequal duration steps under Type-I hybrid censoring scheme for a general log-location-scale lifetime distribution is discussed here. Censoring is allowed only at the change-stress point in the final stage. Based on the cumulative exposure model, the determination of the optimal choice for Weibull, lognormal and log-logistic lifetime distributions are considered by minimization of the asymptotic variance of the maximum likelihood estimate of the pth percentile of the lifetime at the normal operating condition. Numerical results show that for these lifetime distributions, the optimal k-step-stress ALT design with unequal duration steps under Type-I hybrid censoring scheme reduces just to a 2-step-stress ALT design.

Keywords

Accelerated life-test Cumulative exposure model Fisher information matrix Maximum likelihood method 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors express their sincere thanks to the Editor, Associate Editor, and an anonymous reviewer for their valuable comments and suggestions on an earlier version of this manuscript which led to this improved version. The first author thanks the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of China, Taiwan (Contract No: MOST 106-2118-M-032-006-MY2) for funding this research.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsTamkang UniversityNew Taipei CityTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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