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Statistical Methods & Applications

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 391–402 | Cite as

A genealogy of Florence Nightingale, Charles Darwin, Francis Galton and Francis Ysidro Edgeworth with special reference to their Italian connections and an annexe on Beatrice Webb and Charles Booth

  • Richard William FarebrotherEmail author
Article
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Abstract

In this article we show that several leading natural scientists, statisticians and social scientists born between 1730 and 1930 are closely related by marriage, thereby forming what Annan (Studies in social history: a tribute to C. M. Trevelyan, Longmans, Green, London, pp 241–287, 1955) has named an Intellectual Aristocracy. We also establish that the first three individuals mentioned in our title had family connections with Italy.

Keywords

Genealogy Industrial history Intellectual aristocracy Links by marriage Lunar Society of Birmingham 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to my wife Sheila and to Peter J. Neal and John H. Smith of the University of Manchester for considerable assistance in the preparation of this article. I am also indebted to the Royal National Institute for Blind People (Cymru) for preparing a spoken word copy of Elizabeth Inglis-Jones’s article.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ShrewsburyUK

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